South by Southwest: Katherine Anne Porter and the Burden of Texas History by Janis Stout (review)

South by Southwest: Katherine Anne Porter and the Burden of Texas History by Janis Stout (review) tles, Dorman is perhaps most authoritative in those chapters dealing with the post-frontier and the interwar years, which enables him to register subtle, complex analyses. For example, Dorman's recuperative handling of Hamlin Garland's body of work is illuminating. Reevaluating Garland's writing as both localist and nationalist during different periods of his career provides an opportunity for a provocative reassessment of Garland's underread later works. Dorman is equally adept when depicting nationalist co-optation at the outset of the atomic West, situating the burgeoning militaryindustrial complex against the backdrop of the "unlanding" of Native Americans in the same period (118­22). Curiously, though, for literary scholars, the final chapter, "Hell of a Vision," is the least satisfying. While Dorman ably works through the evolution of new and post-western perspectives, he falls short of imparting a sense of the heavy postmodern wash in which so much of recent western criticism is painted. With this minor complaint in mind, though, in the face of an expanding lexicon of neologisms and complex critical interventions, Hell of a Vision achieves its goal as a platform from which scholars might access, parse, and draw connections between these denser, more specialized arguments. Encyclopedic, attractive in its directness http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

South by Southwest: Katherine Anne Porter and the Burden of Texas History by Janis Stout (review)

Western American Literature, Volume 49 (1) – May 10, 2014

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142
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Abstract

tles, Dorman is perhaps most authoritative in those chapters dealing with the post-frontier and the interwar years, which enables him to register subtle, complex analyses. For example, Dorman's recuperative handling of Hamlin Garland's body of work is illuminating. Reevaluating Garland's writing as both localist and nationalist during different periods of his career provides an opportunity for a provocative reassessment of Garland's underread later works. Dorman is equally adept when depicting nationalist co-optation at the outset of the atomic West, situating the burgeoning militaryindustrial complex against the backdrop of the "unlanding" of Native Americans in the same period (118­22). Curiously, though, for literary scholars, the final chapter, "Hell of a Vision," is the least satisfying. While Dorman ably works through the evolution of new and post-western perspectives, he falls short of imparting a sense of the heavy postmodern wash in which so much of recent western criticism is painted. With this minor complaint in mind, though, in the face of an expanding lexicon of neologisms and complex critical interventions, Hell of a Vision achieves its goal as a platform from which scholars might access, parse, and draw connections between these denser, more specialized arguments. Encyclopedic, attractive in its directness

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: May 10, 2014

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