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Solomon D. Butcher: Photographing the American Dream ed. by John E. Carter (review)

Solomon D. Butcher: Photographing the American Dream ed. by John E. Carter (review) “borders” quite as broadly as it does—here, the generic boundary between a novel and a film is given roughly the same weight as the boundary between two nations—the book misses a chance to explore more fully the ways in which the American West has always been global. Some chapters do strive to uncover a legacy of transcontinental transmission. David Fenimore’s chapter on Horace Greeley, Karl Marx, and the European communitarian influence on nineteenthcentury western settlement is particularly strong. Similarly, Monika Madinabeitia’s chapter on the history of the Basque diaspora and its connection to contemporary Basque music and identity in the American West is especially engaging. On the whole, though, the book stands as an important reminder that the academic study of the American literary and cultural West is not a small discipline, consigned to the dusty corners of a few regions of the United States, but rather a large one: the product and the subject of an expansive, interconnected world. Throughout, its contributors are tireless in their investigations of the porous disciplinary, generic, and political borders that limn the culture of the American West. Stephen J. Mexal California State University, Fullerton John E. Carter, ed., Solomon D. Butcher: http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Solomon D. Butcher: Photographing the American Dream ed. by John E. Carter (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (2) – Aug 16, 2017

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142
Publisher site
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Abstract

“borders” quite as broadly as it does—here, the generic boundary between a novel and a film is given roughly the same weight as the boundary between two nations—the book misses a chance to explore more fully the ways in which the American West has always been global. Some chapters do strive to uncover a legacy of transcontinental transmission. David Fenimore’s chapter on Horace Greeley, Karl Marx, and the European communitarian influence on nineteenthcentury western settlement is particularly strong. Similarly, Monika Madinabeitia’s chapter on the history of the Basque diaspora and its connection to contemporary Basque music and identity in the American West is especially engaging. On the whole, though, the book stands as an important reminder that the academic study of the American literary and cultural West is not a small discipline, consigned to the dusty corners of a few regions of the United States, but rather a large one: the product and the subject of an expansive, interconnected world. Throughout, its contributors are tireless in their investigations of the porous disciplinary, generic, and political borders that limn the culture of the American West. Stephen J. Mexal California State University, Fullerton John E. Carter, ed., Solomon D. Butcher:

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Aug 16, 2017

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