“Refusing to halt”: Mobility and the Quest for Spatial Justice in Helena María Viramontes’s Their Dogs Came with Them and Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange

“Refusing to halt”: Mobility and the Quest for Spatial Justice in Helena María... Abstract: Representations of Los Angeles’s freeways in Helena María Viramontes’s novel Their Dogs Came with Them (2007) and Karen Tei Yamashita’s novel Tropic of Orange (1997) expose the unevenness of contemporary mobility. The novels depict the power and possibility of mobility for some in the globalized economy alongside the violent consequences of socioeconomic immobility that these same venues of neoliberal economic development bring others. By representing the consequences of Los Angeles’s freeway system, the novels convey the unevenness of experiences of globalization, flows of migration, capital, goods and services across borders and within the unstated borders of specific communities. Through their focus on both displacement and mobility, the two works connect transportation geographies to older forms of conquest and colonization and to newer modes of neoliberal economic development. By emphasizing the ways these newer forms of economic control are haunted by violent colonial pasts, the texts attend to the relationship between older and newer forms of spatial control and the relations between both mundane and spectacular forms of oppression. They draw out the complexity and the consequences of transportation technologies by highlighting the physical and socioeconomic immobility that both shapes and produces the experiences of displaced Angelinos. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

“Refusing to halt”: Mobility and the Quest for Spatial Justice in Helena María Viramontes’s Their Dogs Came with Them and Karen Tei Yamashita’s Tropic of Orange

Western American Literature, Volume 48 (1) – Jun 7, 2013

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-western-literature-association/refusing-to-halt-mobility-and-the-quest-for-spatial-justice-in-helena-FXoRz8Xhtp
Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Representations of Los Angeles’s freeways in Helena María Viramontes’s novel Their Dogs Came with Them (2007) and Karen Tei Yamashita’s novel Tropic of Orange (1997) expose the unevenness of contemporary mobility. The novels depict the power and possibility of mobility for some in the globalized economy alongside the violent consequences of socioeconomic immobility that these same venues of neoliberal economic development bring others. By representing the consequences of Los Angeles’s freeway system, the novels convey the unevenness of experiences of globalization, flows of migration, capital, goods and services across borders and within the unstated borders of specific communities. Through their focus on both displacement and mobility, the two works connect transportation geographies to older forms of conquest and colonization and to newer modes of neoliberal economic development. By emphasizing the ways these newer forms of economic control are haunted by violent colonial pasts, the texts attend to the relationship between older and newer forms of spatial control and the relations between both mundane and spectacular forms of oppression. They draw out the complexity and the consequences of transportation technologies by highlighting the physical and socioeconomic immobility that both shapes and produces the experiences of displaced Angelinos.

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Jun 7, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off