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Where We Land: Stories by Daryl Farmer (review)

Where We Land: Stories by Daryl Farmer (review) Readers familiar with Cheyenne histor y will enjoy the perspectives of historically undocumented groups of participants. Th ose unfa- miliar with Cheyenne history will be brought into the discussion in a very engaging manner. Kurt E. Kinbacher Chadron State College Daryl Farmer, Where We Land: Stories. Omaha: Brighthorse Books, 2016. 195 pp. Paper, $14.95. In her 1972 book, Survival: A Th ematic Guide to Canadian Literature, Margaret Atwood argues that the governing trope of British liter- ature is the island, while for American literature it is the frontier. Canadian literature, Atwood holds, is defi ned by the brute theme of survival, be it on the journey, in the storm, or on the sinking ship. Th ematically, Alaskan writers may be closer to their Canadian neighbors than their fellow Americans in the Lower 48. Th e charac- ters we meet in Daryl Farmer’s excellent new collection of stories, Where We Land, are survivors, usually dealing with the consequenc- es of their own decisions. Th e opening line of “On the Old Dena- li Road” spells it out: “To not get yourself in the situation in the fi rst place: that was the key to winter survival in Alaska” (39). Driv- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Where We Land: Stories by Daryl Farmer (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (4) – Feb 9, 2018

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Readers familiar with Cheyenne histor y will enjoy the perspectives of historically undocumented groups of participants. Th ose unfa- miliar with Cheyenne history will be brought into the discussion in a very engaging manner. Kurt E. Kinbacher Chadron State College Daryl Farmer, Where We Land: Stories. Omaha: Brighthorse Books, 2016. 195 pp. Paper, $14.95. In her 1972 book, Survival: A Th ematic Guide to Canadian Literature, Margaret Atwood argues that the governing trope of British liter- ature is the island, while for American literature it is the frontier. Canadian literature, Atwood holds, is defi ned by the brute theme of survival, be it on the journey, in the storm, or on the sinking ship. Th ematically, Alaskan writers may be closer to their Canadian neighbors than their fellow Americans in the Lower 48. Th e charac- ters we meet in Daryl Farmer’s excellent new collection of stories, Where We Land, are survivors, usually dealing with the consequenc- es of their own decisions. Th e opening line of “On the Old Dena- li Road” spells it out: “To not get yourself in the situation in the fi rst place: that was the key to winter survival in Alaska” (39). Driv-

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Feb 9, 2018

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