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The Annual Big Arsenic Fishing Contest! by John Nichols (review)

The Annual Big Arsenic Fishing Contest! by John Nichols (review) to the reader’s understanding but enhances the reading experience with the author’s own beautiful writing. Th e correspondence between the two men is intellectually stimulating as they discuss Waters’s various novels, which are set in both the American Southwest and Mexico. Waters shares his thoughts and love for the Pueblo people, his neighbors in Taos and the inspiration for one of his most famous works, Th e Man Who Killed the Deer. Readers will also fi nd reference to other individuals frequently mentioned when the American Southwest is studied— Mabel Dodge Luhan, John Sinclair, John Manchester, and Dorothy Brett— all Frank Waters’s friends who remain part of the mythos of the Taos area. Th is book, detailing the correspondence between Kishbaugh and Waters plus the refl ections on the in- person meetings the two men had, helps to cement the fact that Waters’s place in western literature is a solid one. His sense of place and his rootedness to his New Mexico home come through loud and clear, both in his own voice and in the refl ections made about him by Kishbaugh. After reading this book one will be eager to revisit one or more of Frank Waters’s http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

The Annual Big Arsenic Fishing Contest! by John Nichols (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (4) – Feb 9, 2018

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

to the reader’s understanding but enhances the reading experience with the author’s own beautiful writing. Th e correspondence between the two men is intellectually stimulating as they discuss Waters’s various novels, which are set in both the American Southwest and Mexico. Waters shares his thoughts and love for the Pueblo people, his neighbors in Taos and the inspiration for one of his most famous works, Th e Man Who Killed the Deer. Readers will also fi nd reference to other individuals frequently mentioned when the American Southwest is studied— Mabel Dodge Luhan, John Sinclair, John Manchester, and Dorothy Brett— all Frank Waters’s friends who remain part of the mythos of the Taos area. Th is book, detailing the correspondence between Kishbaugh and Waters plus the refl ections on the in- person meetings the two men had, helps to cement the fact that Waters’s place in western literature is a solid one. His sense of place and his rootedness to his New Mexico home come through loud and clear, both in his own voice and in the refl ections made about him by Kishbaugh. After reading this book one will be eager to revisit one or more of Frank Waters’s

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Feb 9, 2018

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