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Mapping the Four Corners: Narrating the Hayden Survey of 1875 by Robert S. McPherson and Susan R. Neel, and: Our Indian Summer in the Far West: An Autumn Tour of Fifteen Thousand Miles in Kansas, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, and the Indian Territory by Samuel Nugent Townshend and John George Hyde (review)

Mapping the Four Corners: Narrating the Hayden Survey of 1875 by Robert S. McPherson and Susan R.... and growing suspense, thus avoiding the play’s becoming a preachy piece of ecocriticism, but nevertheless directing our attention onto real ecological issues by rooting the story fi rmly in place. Th rough references to actual counties and towns served by the Ogallala aqui- fer, to pesticide- induced cancer clusters, to a publication on water supply as political power, and to the routine presence of center piv- ot farms, we know this theatrical script of insider O’Gare and out- sider Ken resides in a real world. Finally, we are left with a solution, not a resolution, that puts O’Gare in the shoes of the quintessential frontier sheriff , with his ranch and his wife, sitting in the center of town, watching. Rather than letting that familiar image be settled, Shuttleworth compli- cates our viewing with knowledge of O’Gare’s lie about Ken, and questions for a theatrical production team to unravel about how the actions of O’Gare and his wife have saved the town, or not. In a myriad of additional ways, Shuttleworth has woven a tale with a dark center that raises, uses, and questions frontier myths and Wild West clichés to talk about owning water, all in a script http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Mapping the Four Corners: Narrating the Hayden Survey of 1875 by Robert S. McPherson and Susan R. Neel, and: Our Indian Summer in the Far West: An Autumn Tour of Fifteen Thousand Miles in Kansas, Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, and the Indian Territory by Samuel Nugent Townshend and John George Hyde (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (3) – Nov 30, 2017

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

and growing suspense, thus avoiding the play’s becoming a preachy piece of ecocriticism, but nevertheless directing our attention onto real ecological issues by rooting the story fi rmly in place. Th rough references to actual counties and towns served by the Ogallala aqui- fer, to pesticide- induced cancer clusters, to a publication on water supply as political power, and to the routine presence of center piv- ot farms, we know this theatrical script of insider O’Gare and out- sider Ken resides in a real world. Finally, we are left with a solution, not a resolution, that puts O’Gare in the shoes of the quintessential frontier sheriff , with his ranch and his wife, sitting in the center of town, watching. Rather than letting that familiar image be settled, Shuttleworth compli- cates our viewing with knowledge of O’Gare’s lie about Ken, and questions for a theatrical production team to unravel about how the actions of O’Gare and his wife have saved the town, or not. In a myriad of additional ways, Shuttleworth has woven a tale with a dark center that raises, uses, and questions frontier myths and Wild West clichés to talk about owning water, all in a script

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Nov 30, 2017

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