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Immortal for Quite Some Time by Scott Abbott (review)

Immortal for Quite Some Time by Scott Abbott (review) Scott Abbott, Immortal for Quite Some Time. Salt Lake City: U of Utah P, 2016. 257 pp. Paper, $24.95; e- book, $20. Scott Abbott starts Immortal for Quite Some Time by insisting that it is not a memoir, but it certainly reads like one. Most of the book consists of a series of snippets from his life, snapshots laid end to end. Many are no more than a paragraph, often two or three to a page. Th ese unconnected memories eventually coalesce into an overall image of an unhappy man: unhappy with his Mormon re- ligion, unhappy with his Mormon family, and often unhappy with his partially Mormon self. Th e self- refl ection is built around trying to understand the life of his gay brother, John, and his death from AIDS. But for the lon- gest time the task feels almost abstract. Th e author admits that his wife and others have accused him of “emotional distance,” and I think the reader feels it frequently. Th e account is more often in- teresting than moving. Th ere are exceptions, of course, such as the long but equally sparse list of items found in John’s apartment af- ter his http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

Immortal for Quite Some Time by Scott Abbott (review)

Western American Literature , Volume 52 (4) – Feb 9, 2018

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

Scott Abbott, Immortal for Quite Some Time. Salt Lake City: U of Utah P, 2016. 257 pp. Paper, $24.95; e- book, $20. Scott Abbott starts Immortal for Quite Some Time by insisting that it is not a memoir, but it certainly reads like one. Most of the book consists of a series of snippets from his life, snapshots laid end to end. Many are no more than a paragraph, often two or three to a page. Th ese unconnected memories eventually coalesce into an overall image of an unhappy man: unhappy with his Mormon re- ligion, unhappy with his Mormon family, and often unhappy with his partially Mormon self. Th e self- refl ection is built around trying to understand the life of his gay brother, John, and his death from AIDS. But for the lon- gest time the task feels almost abstract. Th e author admits that his wife and others have accused him of “emotional distance,” and I think the reader feels it frequently. Th e account is more often in- teresting than moving. Th ere are exceptions, of course, such as the long but equally sparse list of items found in John’s apartment af- ter his

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Feb 9, 2018

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