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#EquityOutdoors: Public Lands and the Decolonial Mediascape

#EquityOutdoors: Public Lands and the Decolonial Mediascape #EquityOutdoors Public Lands and the Decolonial Mediascape Ashley E. Reis In her introduction to An Indigenous People’s History of the United States (2014), Roxanne Dunbar- Ortiz models a practical rhetorical position on the United States’ history of colonialism. “To say that the United States is a colonialist settler- state,” she writes, “is not to make an accusation but rather to face historical reality, without which consideration not much in US history makes sense, unless Indigenous peoples are erased” (7). Actively attending to and viscerally contending with the historical reality that “the great civilizations of the Western Hemisphere, the very evidence of the Western Hemisphere, were wantonly destroyed, the gradual progress of humanity interrupted and set upon a path of greed and destruction” is both a necessity and a responsibility to the ancestors and descendants of all parties, she declares (1). To seek what Dunbar- Ortiz calls “a history of redemption and reconciliation” is a disingenuous and harmful neocolonial maneuver that erases the true essence of the historical narrative in favor of a scripted origin story, which forms a vital core of US settler colonial identity and the values that guide the United States as a nation. On the other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Western American Literature The Western Literature Association

#EquityOutdoors: Public Lands and the Decolonial Mediascape

Western American Literature , Volume 54 (1) – Jun 18, 2019

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Publisher
The Western Literature Association
Copyright
Copyright © Western Literature Association
ISSN
1948-7142

Abstract

#EquityOutdoors Public Lands and the Decolonial Mediascape Ashley E. Reis In her introduction to An Indigenous People’s History of the United States (2014), Roxanne Dunbar- Ortiz models a practical rhetorical position on the United States’ history of colonialism. “To say that the United States is a colonialist settler- state,” she writes, “is not to make an accusation but rather to face historical reality, without which consideration not much in US history makes sense, unless Indigenous peoples are erased” (7). Actively attending to and viscerally contending with the historical reality that “the great civilizations of the Western Hemisphere, the very evidence of the Western Hemisphere, were wantonly destroyed, the gradual progress of humanity interrupted and set upon a path of greed and destruction” is both a necessity and a responsibility to the ancestors and descendants of all parties, she declares (1). To seek what Dunbar- Ortiz calls “a history of redemption and reconciliation” is a disingenuous and harmful neocolonial maneuver that erases the true essence of the historical narrative in favor of a scripted origin story, which forms a vital core of US settler colonial identity and the values that guide the United States as a nation. On the other

Journal

Western American LiteratureThe Western Literature Association

Published: Jun 18, 2019

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