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Theatre and Culture in Early Modern England, 1650–1737: From Leviathan to Licensing Act ed. by Catie Gill (review)

Theatre and Culture in Early Modern England, 1650–1737: From Leviathan to Licensing Act ed. by... speculates about what Behn thought and felt. Primarily, however, it seems designed to inveigh against critics who label her a ``feminist,'' although what either they-- whoever they are--or Ms. Hayden mean by that term remains undisclosed. ``If then we must label her,'' Ms. Hayden writes in her final sentence, ``let it be as a playwright or poet, as a fiction writer or translator, since, after all, she frequently included herself as one of the brothers of the pen.'' When it comes to Behn, it seems we should be in a postgender world. Since the previous 200 pages often acknowledge that Behn encountered and sometimes used gender ideology, it surprises that this is really what Ms. Hayden wants us to conclude from her work. Only two paragraphs before, she notes, ``That Behn claimed a space within the masculine domain of public writing was highly irregular and certainly made her a target for satire.'' Nor is it news anymore that the term ``feminist,'' however defined, is problematic when used to describe the ideologies and methods of women in times and cultures other than the one that coined the term. Overall, Of Love and War's extensive lists, descriptions, and summaries evince http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Theatre and Culture in Early Modern England, 1650–1737: From Leviathan to Licensing Act ed. by Catie Gill (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
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Abstract

speculates about what Behn thought and felt. Primarily, however, it seems designed to inveigh against critics who label her a ``feminist,'' although what either they-- whoever they are--or Ms. Hayden mean by that term remains undisclosed. ``If then we must label her,'' Ms. Hayden writes in her final sentence, ``let it be as a playwright or poet, as a fiction writer or translator, since, after all, she frequently included herself as one of the brothers of the pen.'' When it comes to Behn, it seems we should be in a postgender world. Since the previous 200 pages often acknowledge that Behn encountered and sometimes used gender ideology, it surprises that this is really what Ms. Hayden wants us to conclude from her work. Only two paragraphs before, she notes, ``That Behn claimed a space within the masculine domain of public writing was highly irregular and certainly made her a target for satire.'' Nor is it news anymore that the term ``feminist,'' however defined, is problematic when used to describe the ideologies and methods of women in times and cultures other than the one that coined the term. Overall, Of Love and War's extensive lists, descriptions, and summaries evince

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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