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The Eighteenth-Century Novel and the Secularization of Ethics by Carol Stewart (review)

The Eighteenth-Century Novel and the Secularization of Ethics by Carol Stewart (review) this edition's destined reader--the student--will appreciate this reliable text and its notes. M-C. Newbould University of Cambridge CAROL STEWART. The Eighteenth-Century Novel and the Secularization of Ethics. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate, 2010. Pp. 220. £55. Ms. Stewart surveys the eighteenthcentury novel ``as a new arena for moral and political controversy; as a means of supporting the prevailing order or protesting against it; and as a means of gaining fame, influence and--not least--money.'' She pursues these and other themes in five chapters covering the canonical novelists, including Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sarah Fielding, Lennox, Sheridan, Sterne, Mackenzie, Walpole, Burney and Godwin. Each major novel is contextualized intellectually and biographically. Her portraits of Richardson, Fielding, Smollett and Sterne stand out as particularly illuminating, and the book makes for a fine introduction to the eighteenth-century novel, deserving shelf space alongside Brean Hammond and Shaun Regan's Making the Novel: Fiction and Society in Britain, 1660­1789 (2006) and John Richetti's The English Novel in History 1700­1780 (1989). Holding this sprawling study together is a simple proposition: as the clergy lost cultural authority over the course of the eighteenth century, the novel rushed in to take its place as moral guide. Like William B. Warner's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

The Eighteenth-Century Novel and the Secularization of Ethics by Carol Stewart (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
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Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
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2165-0624
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Abstract

this edition's destined reader--the student--will appreciate this reliable text and its notes. M-C. Newbould University of Cambridge CAROL STEWART. The Eighteenth-Century Novel and the Secularization of Ethics. Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate, 2010. Pp. 220. £55. Ms. Stewart surveys the eighteenthcentury novel ``as a new arena for moral and political controversy; as a means of supporting the prevailing order or protesting against it; and as a means of gaining fame, influence and--not least--money.'' She pursues these and other themes in five chapters covering the canonical novelists, including Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sarah Fielding, Lennox, Sheridan, Sterne, Mackenzie, Walpole, Burney and Godwin. Each major novel is contextualized intellectually and biographically. Her portraits of Richardson, Fielding, Smollett and Sterne stand out as particularly illuminating, and the book makes for a fine introduction to the eighteenth-century novel, deserving shelf space alongside Brean Hammond and Shaun Regan's Making the Novel: Fiction and Society in Britain, 1660­1789 (2006) and John Richetti's The English Novel in History 1700­1780 (1989). Holding this sprawling study together is a simple proposition: as the clergy lost cultural authority over the course of the eighteenth century, the novel rushed in to take its place as moral guide. Like William B. Warner's

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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