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Swift as Priest and Satirist ed. by Todd C. Parker (review)

Swift as Priest and Satirist ed. by Todd C. Parker (review) in Swift's presentation of his Rose Tavern eulogist''--a consideration that critics often appear to overlook, despite Swift's equally playful insistence in the same poem that he had been ``born to introduce'' irony. Not all of the essays in the final part of Swift's Travels fall within The Scriblerian's purview. In Ronald Paulson's essay, there is little of interest to Swiftians beyond the comparison drawn between Hogarth's engraving, Enthusiasm Delineated (c. 1761) and A Tale of a Tub. In the best essay in this section, Nicholas Hudson convincingly argues that ``what really preoccupied Pope was, surely, not how money was made. Rather, his satire dwells on who was making the money--the intangible value of those who had risen, including himself, as the result of the expansion of the marketplace in all sorts of goods, including poetry.'' After all, The Dunciad is less about the failure of the ``Whig Patricians,'' who ``inspire'' the Dunces ``wond'rous Works,'' to patronize poetry, than about the fact that, in Pope's eyes, they patronize the wrong poets, while ``Gay dies un-pension'd with a hundred Friends / Hibernian Politicks, O Swift, thy doom, / And Pope's translating three whole Years with Broome.'' Thomas Keymer revisits Partridge's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Swift as Priest and Satirist ed. by Todd C. Parker (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
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Abstract

in Swift's presentation of his Rose Tavern eulogist''--a consideration that critics often appear to overlook, despite Swift's equally playful insistence in the same poem that he had been ``born to introduce'' irony. Not all of the essays in the final part of Swift's Travels fall within The Scriblerian's purview. In Ronald Paulson's essay, there is little of interest to Swiftians beyond the comparison drawn between Hogarth's engraving, Enthusiasm Delineated (c. 1761) and A Tale of a Tub. In the best essay in this section, Nicholas Hudson convincingly argues that ``what really preoccupied Pope was, surely, not how money was made. Rather, his satire dwells on who was making the money--the intangible value of those who had risen, including himself, as the result of the expansion of the marketplace in all sorts of goods, including poetry.'' After all, The Dunciad is less about the failure of the ``Whig Patricians,'' who ``inspire'' the Dunces ``wond'rous Works,'' to patronize poetry, than about the fact that, in Pope's eyes, they patronize the wrong poets, while ``Gay dies un-pension'd with a hundred Friends / Hibernian Politicks, O Swift, thy doom, / And Pope's translating three whole Years with Broome.'' Thomas Keymer revisits Partridge's

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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