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Religion, Politics and Dissent, 1660–1832: Essays in Honour of James E. Bradley ed. by Robert D. Cornwall and William Gibson (review)

Religion, Politics and Dissent, 1660–1832: Essays in Honour of James E. Bradley ed. by Robert D.... chemy to Boyle and the development of modern science. He deftly details the social and intellectual influences that made Boyle one of the great men of science. Like many of his era, his formal education ended by the age of twelve, followed by a five-year Grand Tour with his brother and a tutor. He returned to England in 1644 and spent the next decade mainly at a family estate in Dorset, reading and writing. Boyle's wealth and status as a younger son of the Earl of Cork allowed him the leisure to thus continue his education and largely ignore the Civil Wars that raged around him. What he called his ``invisible college'' of correspondents circulated books, letters, and ideas. Boyle filtered and distilled the knowledge of an extraordinary age to produce his own prodigious discoveries. Even among historians of science-- except of course for Boyle scholars--he is best known for the air pump he built with Robert Hooke in 1659 and detailed in New Experiments, Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring in the Air and its Effects (1660). It is one of the most remarkable books of a remarkable decade. Although much of Boyle's science focused on the intersections of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Religion, Politics and Dissent, 1660–1832: Essays in Honour of James E. Bradley ed. by Robert D. Cornwall and William Gibson (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
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Abstract

chemy to Boyle and the development of modern science. He deftly details the social and intellectual influences that made Boyle one of the great men of science. Like many of his era, his formal education ended by the age of twelve, followed by a five-year Grand Tour with his brother and a tutor. He returned to England in 1644 and spent the next decade mainly at a family estate in Dorset, reading and writing. Boyle's wealth and status as a younger son of the Earl of Cork allowed him the leisure to thus continue his education and largely ignore the Civil Wars that raged around him. What he called his ``invisible college'' of correspondents circulated books, letters, and ideas. Boyle filtered and distilled the knowledge of an extraordinary age to produce his own prodigious discoveries. Even among historians of science-- except of course for Boyle scholars--he is best known for the air pump he built with Robert Hooke in 1659 and detailed in New Experiments, Physico-Mechanical, Touching the Spring in the Air and its Effects (1660). It is one of the most remarkable books of a remarkable decade. Although much of Boyle's science focused on the intersections of

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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