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Of Love and War: The Political Voice in the Early Plays of Aphra Behn by Judy A. Hayden (review)

Of Love and War: The Political Voice in the Early Plays of Aphra Behn by Judy A. Hayden (review) at roughly the same time in Wales, Ireland, and Scotland. For example, the section on Wales begins with the well-known transplant, Katharine Philips, who in her poem ``On the Welch Language'' ``engages with Wales'' in ``almost ethnographic tones,'' while noting that the local language ``hath her beauty Lost.'' Ms. Chedgzoy places in dramatic parallel with Philips one Magdalen Lloyd, a transplant from Wales in domestic service in London, whose memories provide comfort and ``human connections despite geographical separation.'' The chapter on ``Women's Writings and the Memory of War'' examines Bradstreet's mediation of past history and current civil war in the 1640s. Attention is also turned to the step-daughters of Margaret Cavendish--Elizabeth Brackley and Jane Cavendish--and their turn to memories that sustained them through the trials of the Civil War, while their father was first in battle and later in exile, and their ancestral homes were besieged and sometimes occupied by Roundheads. Not enough is done with these two fascinating women. Their manuscript collection, Bod. MS. Rawl. 16, an admixture of verse; a play about marriage choices, Concealed Fansyes; and a strange Pastorall involving witches, is discussed without much logic, and, oddly, there is no reference to the publication http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Of Love and War: The Political Voice in the Early Plays of Aphra Behn by Judy A. Hayden (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
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Abstract

at roughly the same time in Wales, Ireland, and Scotland. For example, the section on Wales begins with the well-known transplant, Katharine Philips, who in her poem ``On the Welch Language'' ``engages with Wales'' in ``almost ethnographic tones,'' while noting that the local language ``hath her beauty Lost.'' Ms. Chedgzoy places in dramatic parallel with Philips one Magdalen Lloyd, a transplant from Wales in domestic service in London, whose memories provide comfort and ``human connections despite geographical separation.'' The chapter on ``Women's Writings and the Memory of War'' examines Bradstreet's mediation of past history and current civil war in the 1640s. Attention is also turned to the step-daughters of Margaret Cavendish--Elizabeth Brackley and Jane Cavendish--and their turn to memories that sustained them through the trials of the Civil War, while their father was first in battle and later in exile, and their ancestral homes were besieged and sometimes occupied by Roundheads. Not enough is done with these two fascinating women. Their manuscript collection, Bod. MS. Rawl. 16, an admixture of verse; a play about marriage choices, Concealed Fansyes; and a strange Pastorall involving witches, is discussed without much logic, and, oddly, there is no reference to the publication

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The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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