Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Interviews by Michael Winterbottom (review)

Interviews by Michael Winterbottom (review) Dublin drapier. Swift himself admits to polemics when he writes to Pope about his history of the four last years of the Queen's reign, ``as necessary materials to qualify me for doing something in an employment then designed me.'' Given the chronological limits of the themes pursued in this chapter, Mr. Jamoussi has an easier time with Defoe, with citations of his generally consistent positions during his early years writing for his benefactor, Harley. Much is written about Defoe's views on liberty and freedom with use made of his ``Appeal to Honour and Justice,'' supposedly his true account of his conduct in public affairs; but how reliable is a concocted apology by a frightened polemicist who fears drastic penalties for his earlier party diatribes, penned to elicit sympathy for a very sick and frightened propagandist who had not long to live? (He died in 1731.) A tic in Chapter One becomes more pronounced in the chapters that follow. To confirm a position that Swift and Defoe held, Mr. Jamoussi will surround or overwhelm each with quotations from their contemporaries. These accumulated evidences of shared beliefs, or at times binary models, displace any consideration of the writers' occasional narratives. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Interviews by Michael Winterbottom (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-scriblerian-and-the-kit-cats/interviews-by-michael-winterbottom-review-EkiHfiyF27
Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dublin drapier. Swift himself admits to polemics when he writes to Pope about his history of the four last years of the Queen's reign, ``as necessary materials to qualify me for doing something in an employment then designed me.'' Given the chronological limits of the themes pursued in this chapter, Mr. Jamoussi has an easier time with Defoe, with citations of his generally consistent positions during his early years writing for his benefactor, Harley. Much is written about Defoe's views on liberty and freedom with use made of his ``Appeal to Honour and Justice,'' supposedly his true account of his conduct in public affairs; but how reliable is a concocted apology by a frightened polemicist who fears drastic penalties for his earlier party diatribes, penned to elicit sympathy for a very sick and frightened propagandist who had not long to live? (He died in 1731.) A tic in Chapter One becomes more pronounced in the chapters that follow. To confirm a position that Swift and Defoe held, Mr. Jamoussi will surround or overwhelm each with quotations from their contemporaries. These accumulated evidences of shared beliefs, or at times binary models, displace any consideration of the writers' occasional narratives.

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

There are no references for this article.