Exploring the Richardson Circle Using the Orlando Database

Exploring the Richardson Circle Using the Orlando Database Exploring the Richardson Circle Using the Orlando Database, http://orlando. cambridge.org Most readers of this journal will be familiar already with Cambridge University Press's magisterial database, Orlando: Women's Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present, overseen by Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, and Isobel Grundy. The database, which has changed the parameters of the scholarship and teaching of British women's writing, has long been brilliantly supervised by Grundy, whose efforts have opened doors for grateful scholars. My review considers the database's coverage of the small but influential, widely recognized, and self-conscious group of intellectual women who assisted Richardson with his second and third novels, Clarissa (1747­1748) and Sir Charles Grandison (1753­ 1754). (Though the novelist corresponded with many different people, critics typically use the tag ``Richardson's circle'' to name the literary coterie that gathered around him at his second home in North End, a group of brilliant young women, many of whom would themselves produce distinguished writing.) Its range is not as narrow as might first appear, for the task requires an evaluation of how far a well-known literary coterie is represented in a database where the primary structural focus is on individual lives and single-authored http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Exploring the Richardson Circle Using the Orlando Database

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats, Volume 45 (1) – Dec 19, 2012

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Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
Publisher site
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Abstract

Exploring the Richardson Circle Using the Orlando Database, http://orlando. cambridge.org Most readers of this journal will be familiar already with Cambridge University Press's magisterial database, Orlando: Women's Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present, overseen by Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, and Isobel Grundy. The database, which has changed the parameters of the scholarship and teaching of British women's writing, has long been brilliantly supervised by Grundy, whose efforts have opened doors for grateful scholars. My review considers the database's coverage of the small but influential, widely recognized, and self-conscious group of intellectual women who assisted Richardson with his second and third novels, Clarissa (1747­1748) and Sir Charles Grandison (1753­ 1754). (Though the novelist corresponded with many different people, critics typically use the tag ``Richardson's circle'' to name the literary coterie that gathered around him at his second home in North End, a group of brilliant young women, many of whom would themselves produce distinguished writing.) Its range is not as narrow as might first appear, for the task requires an evaluation of how far a well-known literary coterie is represented in a database where the primary structural focus is on individual lives and single-authored

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Published: Dec 19, 2012

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