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Dangerous Women, Libertine Epicures, and the Rise of Sensibility, 1670–1730 by Laura Linker (review)

Dangerous Women, Libertine Epicures, and the Rise of Sensibility, 1670–1730 by Laura Linker (review) of ``collusive resistance,'' a via media between force and fraud. As a study in ``passive obedience and non-resistance,'' Pamela succeeds. However, the thesis that Pamela is an exploration of ``the meaning and legitimacy of new-tory sensibilities in a Hanoverian age'' does not. The same holds for the brilliant study of Clarissa. Ms. Bowers calls our attention to the subtlest implications of the fictional text, where her detailed study of Clarissa's rejection of Wyerley shows that for Clarissa, marriage becomes ``tragically circumscribed by `force or fraud.''' But that this positions Richardson on the cusp of an emerging modernity or as one still struggling with the issues of submission and obedience to the patriarch, whether monarch or mate, is questionable. A short coda presents yet another outstanding close textual analysis, this on Sir Charles Grandison, again with a grounding in the politics and more so the religious issues at the beginning of the reign of George III. In its discussion of power, domination, desire, and religion, Ms. Bowers makes a strong case for a reconsideration of Richardson's last novel. This valuable book provides a strong study of the sociopolitical chaos between 1660 and 1760; it offers close textual readings of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Dangerous Women, Libertine Epicures, and the Rise of Sensibility, 1670–1730 by Laura Linker (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
Publisher site
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Abstract

of ``collusive resistance,'' a via media between force and fraud. As a study in ``passive obedience and non-resistance,'' Pamela succeeds. However, the thesis that Pamela is an exploration of ``the meaning and legitimacy of new-tory sensibilities in a Hanoverian age'' does not. The same holds for the brilliant study of Clarissa. Ms. Bowers calls our attention to the subtlest implications of the fictional text, where her detailed study of Clarissa's rejection of Wyerley shows that for Clarissa, marriage becomes ``tragically circumscribed by `force or fraud.''' But that this positions Richardson on the cusp of an emerging modernity or as one still struggling with the issues of submission and obedience to the patriarch, whether monarch or mate, is questionable. A short coda presents yet another outstanding close textual analysis, this on Sir Charles Grandison, again with a grounding in the politics and more so the religious issues at the beginning of the reign of George III. In its discussion of power, domination, desire, and religion, Ms. Bowers makes a strong case for a reconsideration of Richardson's last novel. This valuable book provides a strong study of the sociopolitical chaos between 1660 and 1760; it offers close textual readings of

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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