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A Modest Proposal in the Context of Swift’s Irish Tracts: A Relevance-Theoretic Study by Maria-Angeles Ruiz Moneva (review)

A Modest Proposal in the Context of Swift’s Irish Tracts: A Relevance-Theoretic Study by... wrinkle in her argument, she observes the paradox: ``Religion itself was `secularized''' in the period. While this may be a rather strained interpretation of ``secularization,'' it points to the fact that the Church remains a powerful presence in her study, something that strengthens, rather than weakens her reading of eighteenth-century fiction. This is nowhere more evident than in the chapter on Tristram Shandy, the best and most focused of the book, which persuasively argues that Sterne puts the Latitudinarian values of ``tolerance, moderate skepticism, [and] distrust of totalizing theories'' in the service of a ``liberal'' and ``reformist agenda.'' A significant contribution to the study of the relation between Sterne's fiction and his religious beliefs, this chapter should be read alongside Tim Parnell's overlapping explorations of the subject in recent issues of The Shandean. Ms. Stewart's treatment of ethics is less successful. Though she professes an interest in ethics as ``moral philosophy,'' she does not bring the same learning to the subject as she does to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century religion. By narrowly identifying the compatibility of ``selfinterest'' and ``virtue'' with Latitudinarianism, for example, she overlooks moral philosophy's long tradition of reflections on the good life, dating back to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

A Modest Proposal in the Context of Swift’s Irish Tracts: A Relevance-Theoretic Study by Maria-Angeles Ruiz Moneva (review)

The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats , Volume 45 (2)

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Publisher
The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats
Copyright
Copyright © Roy S. Wolper, W. B. Gerard, and Derek Taylor
ISSN
2165-0624
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Abstract

wrinkle in her argument, she observes the paradox: ``Religion itself was `secularized''' in the period. While this may be a rather strained interpretation of ``secularization,'' it points to the fact that the Church remains a powerful presence in her study, something that strengthens, rather than weakens her reading of eighteenth-century fiction. This is nowhere more evident than in the chapter on Tristram Shandy, the best and most focused of the book, which persuasively argues that Sterne puts the Latitudinarian values of ``tolerance, moderate skepticism, [and] distrust of totalizing theories'' in the service of a ``liberal'' and ``reformist agenda.'' A significant contribution to the study of the relation between Sterne's fiction and his religious beliefs, this chapter should be read alongside Tim Parnell's overlapping explorations of the subject in recent issues of The Shandean. Ms. Stewart's treatment of ethics is less successful. Though she professes an interest in ethics as ``moral philosophy,'' she does not bring the same learning to the subject as she does to seventeenth- and eighteenth-century religion. By narrowly identifying the compatibility of ``selfinterest'' and ``virtue'' with Latitudinarianism, for example, she overlooks moral philosophy's long tradition of reflections on the good life, dating back to the

Journal

The Scriblerian and the Kit-CatsThe Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

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