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Cell Culture Automation - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life Sciences

Cell Culture Automation - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life Sciences READY WHEN YOU AREAutomated tissue culture systems, like the SelecT automated mammalian cell culture system shown here, provide a level of plate-to-plate uniformity that can be difficult to achieve manually. And because the systems work 24/7, they can have assay-ready plates available early on a Monday morning. Much has been written of how robots have been used to streamline drug development efforts. Robots never vary their routines, never tire, and never make mistakes. But they also require a steady stream of input material to work with, and when it comes to cultured cells, that can be a problem. Although a single assay may require only a few hundred or thousand cells, high-throughput screening (HTS) programs often involve hundreds of thousands or even millions of tests. That volume of work strains resources to the point that even giant drug companies like AstraZeneca have trouble keeping up. "It was difficult to manually provide enough cells to meet the increased demand from HTS," says Sean Sales, applications consultant for RTS Life Science in Manchester, UK, a company specializing in providing automated solutions. So AstraZeneca teamed up with RTS to develop an automated solution. Installed in mid 2003 at AstraZeneca's Charnwood facility http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Scientist The Scientist

Cell Culture Automation - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life Sciences

Abstract

READY WHEN YOU AREAutomated tissue culture systems, like the SelecT automated mammalian cell culture system shown here, provide a level of plate-to-plate uniformity that can be difficult to achieve manually. And because the systems work 24/7, they can have assay-ready plates available early on a Monday morning. Much has been written of how robots have been used to streamline drug development efforts. Robots never vary their routines, never tire, and never make mistakes. But they also require a steady stream of input material to work with, and when it comes to cultured cells, that can be a problem. Although a single assay may require only a few hundred or thousand cells, high-throughput screening (HTS) programs often involve hundreds of thousands or even millions of tests. That volume of work strains resources to the point that even giant drug companies like AstraZeneca have trouble keeping up. "It was difficult to manually provide enough cells to meet the increased demand from HTS," says Sean Sales, applications consultant for RTS Life Science in Manchester, UK, a company specializing in providing automated solutions. So AstraZeneca teamed up with RTS to develop an automated solution. Installed in mid 2003 at AstraZeneca's Charnwood facility
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