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Languages of the Unheard: Why Militant Protest is Good for Democracy by Stephen D’Arcy (review)

Languages of the Unheard: Why Militant Protest is Good for Democracy by Stephen D’Arcy (review) 414 / labour /le travail 74 seal was on the road to extinction. Zelko also presents a curious portrayal of how Greenpeace dealt with the local sealers. He argues that, "despite his best efforts, [Robert] Hunter's vision of a worker-conservationist coalition was not to be realized." (260) He notes that a "successful alliance would have required Hunter, or somebody with similar negotiating skills, to remain in the region for much longer that a few weeks." (260) He later states the reason Hunter could not put in more of an effort was that he had left the seal campaign to join McTaggart in Wales to write a book about the French campaign. (263) How that constitutes a best effort is left unclear. While glossing over the criticisms of Greenpeace is problematic, the fundamental problem lies within the failed promise of the title. Zelko states in his conclusion that Greenpeace, "did not develop into the kind of grassroots, participatory movement that Irving Stowe had hoped to build." (318) He argues that, "to one degree or another, these men had come to accept the need for hierarchy and professionalism as a by-product of Greenpeace's modus operandi." (318) This is a radical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Labour / Le Travail The Canadian Committee on Labour History

Languages of the Unheard: Why Militant Protest is Good for Democracy by Stephen D’Arcy (review)

Labour / Le Travail , Volume 74 (1) – Nov 8, 2014

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Publisher
The Canadian Committee on Labour History
Copyright
Copyright © Canadian Committee on Labour History
ISSN
1911-4842
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Abstract

414 / labour /le travail 74 seal was on the road to extinction. Zelko also presents a curious portrayal of how Greenpeace dealt with the local sealers. He argues that, "despite his best efforts, [Robert] Hunter's vision of a worker-conservationist coalition was not to be realized." (260) He notes that a "successful alliance would have required Hunter, or somebody with similar negotiating skills, to remain in the region for much longer that a few weeks." (260) He later states the reason Hunter could not put in more of an effort was that he had left the seal campaign to join McTaggart in Wales to write a book about the French campaign. (263) How that constitutes a best effort is left unclear. While glossing over the criticisms of Greenpeace is problematic, the fundamental problem lies within the failed promise of the title. Zelko states in his conclusion that Greenpeace, "did not develop into the kind of grassroots, participatory movement that Irving Stowe had hoped to build." (318) He argues that, "to one degree or another, these men had come to accept the need for hierarchy and professionalism as a by-product of Greenpeace's modus operandi." (318) This is a radical

Journal

Labour / Le TravailThe Canadian Committee on Labour History

Published: Nov 8, 2014

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