Understanding Adipocyte Differentiation

Understanding Adipocyte Differentiation Abstract Gregoire, Francine M., Cynthia M. Smas, and Hei Sook Sul. Understanding Adipocyte Differentiation. Physiol. Rev . 78: 783–809, 1998. — The adipocyte plays a critical role in energy balance. Adipose tissue growth involves an increase in adipocyte size and the formation of new adipocytes from precursor cells. For the last 20 years, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of adipocyte differentiation have been extensively studied using preadipocyte culture systems. Committed preadipocytes undergo growth arrest and subsequent terminal differentiation into adipocytes. This is accompanied by a dramatic increase in expression of adipocyte genes including adipocyte fatty acid binding protein and lipid-metabolizing enzymes. Characterization of regulatory regions of adipose-specific genes has led to the identification of the transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), which play a key role in the complex transcriptional cascade during adipocyte differentiation. Growth and differentiation of preadipocytes is controlled by communication between individual cells or between cells and the extracellular environment. Various hormones and growth factors that affect adipocyte differentiation in a positive or negative manner have been identified. In addition, components involved in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions such as preadipocyte factor-1 and extracellular matrix proteins are also pivotal in regulating the differentiation process. Identification of these molecules has yielded clues to the biochemical pathways that ultimately result in transcriptional activation via PPAR-γ and C/EBP. Studies on the regulation of the these transcription factors and the mode of action of various agents that influence adipocyte differentiation will reveal the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying adipose tissue development. Footnotes The work from the authors' laboratory was supported by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Grant DK-50828 (to H. S. Sul). Present address of F. M. Gregoire: Rowe Genetics Program, Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616. Copyright © 1998 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physiological Reviews The American Physiological Society

Understanding Adipocyte Differentiation

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0031-9333
eISSN
1522-1210
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Abstract

Abstract Gregoire, Francine M., Cynthia M. Smas, and Hei Sook Sul. Understanding Adipocyte Differentiation. Physiol. Rev . 78: 783–809, 1998. — The adipocyte plays a critical role in energy balance. Adipose tissue growth involves an increase in adipocyte size and the formation of new adipocytes from precursor cells. For the last 20 years, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of adipocyte differentiation have been extensively studied using preadipocyte culture systems. Committed preadipocytes undergo growth arrest and subsequent terminal differentiation into adipocytes. This is accompanied by a dramatic increase in expression of adipocyte genes including adipocyte fatty acid binding protein and lipid-metabolizing enzymes. Characterization of regulatory regions of adipose-specific genes has led to the identification of the transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), which play a key role in the complex transcriptional cascade during adipocyte differentiation. Growth and differentiation of preadipocytes is controlled by communication between individual cells or between cells and the extracellular environment. Various hormones and growth factors that affect adipocyte differentiation in a positive or negative manner have been identified. In addition, components involved in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions such as preadipocyte factor-1 and extracellular matrix proteins are also pivotal in regulating the differentiation process. Identification of these molecules has yielded clues to the biochemical pathways that ultimately result in transcriptional activation via PPAR-γ and C/EBP. Studies on the regulation of the these transcription factors and the mode of action of various agents that influence adipocyte differentiation will reveal the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying adipose tissue development. Footnotes The work from the authors' laboratory was supported by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Grant DK-50828 (to H. S. Sul). Present address of F. M. Gregoire: Rowe Genetics Program, Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of California, Davis, CA 95616. Copyright © 1998 the American Physiological Society

Journal

Physiological ReviewsThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jan 7, 1998

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