Sympathetic activation cannot fully account for increased plasma renin levels during water deprivation

Sympathetic activation cannot fully account for increased plasma renin levels during water... that follows ganglionic blockade is no greater in deprived than in -replete rats (8). The present study was designed as an initial test of the hypothesis that the increase in levels that occurs is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. To determine if the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary for the increase in activity (PRA), the effect of 48 h of was compared in renal-denervated and sham-operated rats. Because renal denervation alone failed to prevent the increase in PRA, additional experiments were performed to determine if adrenomedullary catecholamine release is required for the dehydration-induced increase in PRA; this was accomplished by comparing the effects of in rats in which the adrenal medullas had been surgically removed, or those in which the adrenal medullas had been removed and the kidneys denervated, with the effects in sham-operated rats. Finally, in view of our earlier study that showed that p-adrenergic blockade significantly reduces PRA in -deprived animals (3), we evaluated the effect of propranolol infusion on PRA in intact, renal-denervated, and adrenal-demedullated rats to determine whether P-adrenergic control of is mediated by the renal nerves, circulating adrenomedullary catecholamines, or both. METHODS DRINKING is unavailable for periods of 24 h or more, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

Sympathetic activation cannot fully account for increased plasma renin levels during water deprivation

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

that follows ganglionic blockade is no greater in deprived than in -replete rats (8). The present study was designed as an initial test of the hypothesis that the increase in levels that occurs is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. To determine if the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary for the increase in activity (PRA), the effect of 48 h of was compared in renal-denervated and sham-operated rats. Because renal denervation alone failed to prevent the increase in PRA, additional experiments were performed to determine if adrenomedullary catecholamine release is required for the dehydration-induced increase in PRA; this was accomplished by comparing the effects of in rats in which the adrenal medullas had been surgically removed, or those in which the adrenal medullas had been removed and the kidneys denervated, with the effects in sham-operated rats. Finally, in view of our earlier study that showed that p-adrenergic blockade significantly reduces PRA in -deprived animals (3), we evaluated the effect of propranolol infusion on PRA in intact, renal-denervated, and adrenal-demedullated rats to determine whether P-adrenergic control of is mediated by the renal nerves, circulating adrenomedullary catecholamines, or both. METHODS DRINKING is unavailable for periods of 24 h or more,

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Apr 1, 1997

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