Strenuous but not moderate exercise increases the thrombotic tendency in healthy sedentary male volunteers

Strenuous but not moderate exercise increases the thrombotic tendency in healthy sedentary male... Abstract We have investigated the effect of moderate and strenuous exercise on experimental arterial thrombus formation in men. Thrombogenesis was measured in 15 sedentary healthy male volunteers at rest or immediately after two standardized exercise tests performed for 30 min on a bicycle ergometer. The exercises were performed at a constant load corresponding to either 50 or 70% maximal oxygen uptake. Thrombus formation was induced ex vivo by exposing a collagen-coated coverslip in a parallel plate perfusion chamber to native nonanticoagulated blood for 3 min. The shear rate at the collagen surface was 2,600 s −1 . Platelet and fibrin deposition was quantified by immunoenzymatic methods. The results show that moderate exercise did not affect arterial thrombus formation. In contrast, platelet thrombus formation on collagen was increased on the average by 20% after 30 min at 70% maximal oxygen uptake ( P = 0.03). Fibrin deposition on collagen remained unchanged with exercise, regardless of its intensity. Thus, with the use of a clinically relevant human experimental model of thrombosis, the present study suggests that exercise of heavy intensity may increase the risk for arterial thrombogenesis in sedentary young healthy male volunteers. blood flow platelets risk factors Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: Y. Cadroy, Laboratoire d'Hématologie, Hôpital de Rangueil, 31054 Toulouse Cedex, France. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. 10.1152/japplphysiol.00206.2002 Copyright © 2002 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Strenuous but not moderate exercise increases the thrombotic tendency in healthy sedentary male volunteers

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
D.O.I.
10.1152/japplphysiol.00206.2002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract We have investigated the effect of moderate and strenuous exercise on experimental arterial thrombus formation in men. Thrombogenesis was measured in 15 sedentary healthy male volunteers at rest or immediately after two standardized exercise tests performed for 30 min on a bicycle ergometer. The exercises were performed at a constant load corresponding to either 50 or 70% maximal oxygen uptake. Thrombus formation was induced ex vivo by exposing a collagen-coated coverslip in a parallel plate perfusion chamber to native nonanticoagulated blood for 3 min. The shear rate at the collagen surface was 2,600 s −1 . Platelet and fibrin deposition was quantified by immunoenzymatic methods. The results show that moderate exercise did not affect arterial thrombus formation. In contrast, platelet thrombus formation on collagen was increased on the average by 20% after 30 min at 70% maximal oxygen uptake ( P = 0.03). Fibrin deposition on collagen remained unchanged with exercise, regardless of its intensity. Thus, with the use of a clinically relevant human experimental model of thrombosis, the present study suggests that exercise of heavy intensity may increase the risk for arterial thrombogenesis in sedentary young healthy male volunteers. blood flow platelets risk factors Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: Y. Cadroy, Laboratoire d'Hématologie, Hôpital de Rangueil, 31054 Toulouse Cedex, France. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. 10.1152/japplphysiol.00206.2002 Copyright © 2002 the American Physiological Society

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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