Stimulatory role for endogenous opioid peptides on postexercise insulin secretion in rats

Stimulatory role for endogenous opioid peptides on postexercise insulin secretion in rats A. FARRELL, Department of Medical PETER BENTE SONNE, KARI MIKINES, HENRIK GALBO of Copenhagen, Research, et al. (20) have shown that the early phase response to an intravenous glucose tolerance test is reduced for 4 but not 24 h . Because EOP are activated during exercise (7), it may be that this peptide system partially regulates secretion during after exercise. Therefore it seems that the combination of exercise EOP antagonism may provide useful information concerning a role for these peptides during times of altered secretion. The predominant methodology used in assessing secretion in animals has been intravenous or oral glucose challenges. The glucose clamp technique (5) provides an in vivo assessment of secretion during steady-state hyperglycemia. This technique has distinct advantages over transient glucose challenges (3). We therefore used the hyperglycemic glucose clamp procedure that has been modified for use in small animals (38). The purpose of this study was to determine whether EOP or prior exercise affected the response to sustained hyperglycemia in awake rats. METHODS ; secretion; catecholamines secretion are both numerous well documented (1,17). Several studies indicate that the endogenous opioid peptides (EOP) are located in the pancreas (39) as well as nerves innervating that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Stimulatory role for endogenous opioid peptides on postexercise insulin secretion in rats

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A. FARRELL, Department of Medical PETER BENTE SONNE, KARI MIKINES, HENRIK GALBO of Copenhagen, Research, et al. (20) have shown that the early phase response to an intravenous glucose tolerance test is reduced for 4 but not 24 h . Because EOP are activated during exercise (7), it may be that this peptide system partially regulates secretion during after exercise. Therefore it seems that the combination of exercise EOP antagonism may provide useful information concerning a role for these peptides during times of altered secretion. The predominant methodology used in assessing secretion in animals has been intravenous or oral glucose challenges. The glucose clamp technique (5) provides an in vivo assessment of secretion during steady-state hyperglycemia. This technique has distinct advantages over transient glucose challenges (3). We therefore used the hyperglycemic glucose clamp procedure that has been modified for use in small animals (38). The purpose of this study was to determine whether EOP or prior exercise affected the response to sustained hyperglycemia in awake rats. METHODS ; secretion; catecholamines secretion are both numerous well documented (1,17). Several studies indicate that the endogenous opioid peptides (EOP) are located in the pancreas (39) as well as nerves innervating that

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Aug 1, 1988

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