Spatial Resolution for Feature Binding Is Impaired in Peripheral and Amblyopic Vision

Spatial Resolution for Feature Binding Is Impaired in Peripheral and Amblyopic Vision We measured spatial resolution for discriminating targets that differed from nearby distractors in either color or orientation or their conjunction. In the fovea of normal human observers, whenever both attributes are big enough to be individually visible, their conjunction is also visible. In the periphery, the two attributes may be visible, but their conjunction may be invisible. We found a similar impairment in resolving conjunctions for the fovea of deprived eyes of humans with abnormal visual development (amblyopia). These results are quantitatively explained by a model of primary visual cortex (V1) in which orientation and color maps are imperfectly co-registered topographically. Our results in persons with amblyopia indicate that the ability of the fovea to compensate for this poor co-registration is consolidated by visual experience during postnatal development. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: P. Neri, School of Optometry and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-2020 (E-mail: pn@white.stanford.edu ) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurophysiology The American Physiological Society

Spatial Resolution for Feature Binding Is Impaired in Peripheral and Amblyopic Vision

Journal of Neurophysiology, Volume 96 (1): 142 – Jul 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-american-physiological-society/spatial-resolution-for-feature-binding-is-impaired-in-peripheral-and-WeL0EWmmPP
Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3077
eISSN
1522-1598
DOI
10.1152/jn.01261.2005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We measured spatial resolution for discriminating targets that differed from nearby distractors in either color or orientation or their conjunction. In the fovea of normal human observers, whenever both attributes are big enough to be individually visible, their conjunction is also visible. In the periphery, the two attributes may be visible, but their conjunction may be invisible. We found a similar impairment in resolving conjunctions for the fovea of deprived eyes of humans with abnormal visual development (amblyopia). These results are quantitatively explained by a model of primary visual cortex (V1) in which orientation and color maps are imperfectly co-registered topographically. Our results in persons with amblyopia indicate that the ability of the fovea to compensate for this poor co-registration is consolidated by visual experience during postnatal development. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: P. Neri, School of Optometry and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-2020 (E-mail: pn@white.stanford.edu )

Journal

Journal of NeurophysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 2006

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off