Regulation of Wound Healing by Growth Factors and Cytokines

Regulation of Wound Healing by Growth Factors and Cytokines Werner, Sabine, and Richard Grose. Regulation of Wound Healing by Growth Factors and Cytokines. Physiol Rev 83: 835–870, 2003; 10.1152/physrev.00032.2002.—Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving blood clotting, inflammation, new tissue formation, and finally tissue remodeling. It is well described at the histological level, but the genes that regulate skin repair have only partially been identified. Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated varied, but in most cases beneficial, effects of exogenous growth factors on the healing process. However, the roles played by endogenous growth factors have remained largely unclear. Initial approaches at addressing this question focused on the expression analysis of various growth factors, cytokines, and their receptors in different wound models, with first functional data being obtained by applying neutralizing antibodies to wounds. During the past few years, the availability of genetically modified mice has allowed elucidation of the function of various genes in the healing process, and these studies have shed light onto the role of growth factors, cytokines, and their downstream effectors in wound repair. This review summarizes the results of expression studies that have been performed in rodents, pigs, and humans to localize growth factors and their receptors in skin wounds. Most importantly, we also report on genetic studies addressing the functions of endogenous growth factors in the wound repair process. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. Werner, Institute of Cell Biology, ETH Zurich, Hönggerberg, HPM D42, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland (E-mail: sabine.werner@cell.biol.ethz.ch ). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physiological Reviews The American Physiological Society

Regulation of Wound Healing by Growth Factors and Cytokines

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0031-9333
eISSN
1522-1210
D.O.I.
10.1152/physrev.00031.2002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Werner, Sabine, and Richard Grose. Regulation of Wound Healing by Growth Factors and Cytokines. Physiol Rev 83: 835–870, 2003; 10.1152/physrev.00032.2002.—Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving blood clotting, inflammation, new tissue formation, and finally tissue remodeling. It is well described at the histological level, but the genes that regulate skin repair have only partially been identified. Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated varied, but in most cases beneficial, effects of exogenous growth factors on the healing process. However, the roles played by endogenous growth factors have remained largely unclear. Initial approaches at addressing this question focused on the expression analysis of various growth factors, cytokines, and their receptors in different wound models, with first functional data being obtained by applying neutralizing antibodies to wounds. During the past few years, the availability of genetically modified mice has allowed elucidation of the function of various genes in the healing process, and these studies have shed light onto the role of growth factors, cytokines, and their downstream effectors in wound repair. This review summarizes the results of expression studies that have been performed in rodents, pigs, and humans to localize growth factors and their receptors in skin wounds. Most importantly, we also report on genetic studies addressing the functions of endogenous growth factors in the wound repair process. Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. Werner, Institute of Cell Biology, ETH Zurich, Hönggerberg, HPM D42, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland (E-mail: sabine.werner@cell.biol.ethz.ch ).

Journal

Physiological ReviewsThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 2003

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