Parietal association cortex in the primate: sensory mechanisms and behavioral modulations

Parietal association cortex in the primate: sensory mechanisms and behavioral modulations DAVID LEE ROBINSON, MICHAEL E. GOLDBERG, AND GREGORY Armed B. Forces Experimental Radiobiology Neurology Division, Behavioral Sciences Department, Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20014 will only respond clearly to our saccade targets in this enhanced condition. Such cells 1 Recent experiments by Mountcastle and colleagues (41, 48, 49) have described cells inevitably respond to passive stimuli, which in posterior parietal cortex of the rhesus are large. 4. “Visual fixation neurons” fire tonically monkey (area 7) that discharge in associawhile the monkey gazes at a target light. tion with eye movements and hand movements. We have studied the activity of cells There are two classes of such cells: those in area 7 during visually guided saccadic eye with limited gaze fields and those with full gaze fields. “Limited gaze field neurons” movements, visual fixations, smooth-pursuit discharge when the animal looks at a target eye movements, and visually guided hand projection movements. We have found that light in some, but not in all directions. The any cell that fires in association with a move- cells fire briskly in response to proper pasment can be driven by a passive sive visual stimuli, even when the animal stimulus, one delivered in the absence http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurophysiology The American Physiological Society

Parietal association cortex in the primate: sensory mechanisms and behavioral modulations

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1978 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3077
eISSN
1522-1598
Publisher site
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Abstract

DAVID LEE ROBINSON, MICHAEL E. GOLDBERG, AND GREGORY Armed B. Forces Experimental Radiobiology Neurology Division, Behavioral Sciences Department, Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20014 will only respond clearly to our saccade targets in this enhanced condition. Such cells 1 Recent experiments by Mountcastle and colleagues (41, 48, 49) have described cells inevitably respond to passive stimuli, which in posterior parietal cortex of the rhesus are large. 4. “Visual fixation neurons” fire tonically monkey (area 7) that discharge in associawhile the monkey gazes at a target light. tion with eye movements and hand movements. We have studied the activity of cells There are two classes of such cells: those in area 7 during visually guided saccadic eye with limited gaze fields and those with full gaze fields. “Limited gaze field neurons” movements, visual fixations, smooth-pursuit discharge when the animal looks at a target eye movements, and visually guided hand projection movements. We have found that light in some, but not in all directions. The any cell that fires in association with a move- cells fire briskly in response to proper pasment can be driven by a passive sive visual stimuli, even when the animal stimulus, one delivered in the absence

Journal

Journal of NeurophysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 1978

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