Naloxone blocks that portion of feeding driven by sweet taste in food-restricted rats

Naloxone blocks that portion of feeding driven by sweet taste in food-restricted rats EAT for a variety of reasons, including stress, time of day, reward or , energy needs. Many investigators have suggested that opioids are important mediators of the reward or palatability component of feeding, particularly of . Blockade of opioid receptors by injection reduces intake of saccharin, sucrose, saline, HCl solutions more effectively than water or quinine solutions (23). Chronic infusion of naltrexone decreases intake in rats given chow plus a 32% sucrose solution more effectively than those given chow alone (27). Administration of selective opioid antagonists of the k-, 6-, K-receptors decreases intake of solutions or palatable foods (2-4, 7), injection of opioid agonists increases intake of solutions (10, 17, 25). Yirmiya et al. (40) found that opioid receptor-deficient mice (CXBK) had significantly lower saccharin preference than control animals (C57BL/ 6Bv). Rockwood Reid (34) reported that reduced intake of a 10% sucrose solution in deprived nondeprived sham-drinking rats, indicating that ’s antidipsogenic actions were not due to feedback from postabsorptional signals. Since this early study, other studies have shown that sham intake of sucrose solutions is markedly decreased by (20, 21). The intake pattern of sham-fed animals given a 10% sucrose solution injected with (1.25 mg/ kg) was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

Naloxone blocks that portion of feeding driven by sweet taste in food-restricted rats

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EAT for a variety of reasons, including stress, time of day, reward or , energy needs. Many investigators have suggested that opioids are important mediators of the reward or palatability component of feeding, particularly of . Blockade of opioid receptors by injection reduces intake of saccharin, sucrose, saline, HCl solutions more effectively than water or quinine solutions (23). Chronic infusion of naltrexone decreases intake in rats given chow plus a 32% sucrose solution more effectively than those given chow alone (27). Administration of selective opioid antagonists of the k-, 6-, K-receptors decreases intake of solutions or palatable foods (2-4, 7), injection of opioid agonists increases intake of solutions (10, 17, 25). Yirmiya et al. (40) found that opioid receptor-deficient mice (CXBK) had significantly lower saccharin preference than control animals (C57BL/ 6Bv). Rockwood Reid (34) reported that reduced intake of a 10% sucrose solution in deprived nondeprived sham-drinking rats, indicating that ’s antidipsogenic actions were not due to feedback from postabsorptional signals. Since this early study, other studies have shown that sham intake of sucrose solutions is markedly decreased by (20, 21). The intake pattern of sham-fed animals given a 10% sucrose solution injected with (1.25 mg/ kg) was

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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