Naloxone attenuates poststimulatory respiratory depression of laryngeal origin in the adult cat

Naloxone attenuates poststimulatory respiratory depression of laryngeal origin in the adult cat Italy Mutolo, Donatella, Fulvia Bongianni, Mario Corda, Giovanni A. Fontana, and Tito Pantaleo. Naloxone attenuates poststimulatory respiratory depression of laryngeal origin in the adult cat. Am. J. PhysioZ. 269 (Regulatory Integrative Comp. PhysioZ. 38): Rl13-R123, 1995.-Poststimulatory depression in respiratory activity induced by laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation was quantitatively investigated in 20 adult cats. The role played in this phenomenon by endogenous opioids was studied using the opiate antagonist naloxone. The effects of hypercapnia on the same phenomenon were also investigated for comparison. Experiments were performed on cats anesthetized with pentobarbitone or a-chloralose, vagotomized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated with 100% OZ. Some animals were also carotid sinus denervated. Respiratory output was monitored as integrated phrenic nerve activity. SLN stimulation produced apnea, which outlasted the stimulation period; when respiration resumed, it was markedly depressed as revealed mainly by a decrease in phrenic minute output, respiratory frequency, and rate of rise of inspiratory activity. Phrenic output recovered gradually to control levels following an exponential time course. These effects varied as a function of the duration of SLN stimulation. Naloxone administration (0.8 mg/kg iv) significantly reduced the duration of poststimulatory apnea and attenuated the depression of phrenic minute output of the first http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

Naloxone attenuates poststimulatory respiratory depression of laryngeal origin in the adult cat

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
Publisher site
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Abstract

Italy Mutolo, Donatella, Fulvia Bongianni, Mario Corda, Giovanni A. Fontana, and Tito Pantaleo. Naloxone attenuates poststimulatory respiratory depression of laryngeal origin in the adult cat. Am. J. PhysioZ. 269 (Regulatory Integrative Comp. PhysioZ. 38): Rl13-R123, 1995.-Poststimulatory depression in respiratory activity induced by laryngeal nerve (SLN) stimulation was quantitatively investigated in 20 adult cats. The role played in this phenomenon by endogenous opioids was studied using the opiate antagonist naloxone. The effects of hypercapnia on the same phenomenon were also investigated for comparison. Experiments were performed on cats anesthetized with pentobarbitone or a-chloralose, vagotomized, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated with 100% OZ. Some animals were also carotid sinus denervated. Respiratory output was monitored as integrated phrenic nerve activity. SLN stimulation produced apnea, which outlasted the stimulation period; when respiration resumed, it was markedly depressed as revealed mainly by a decrease in phrenic minute output, respiratory frequency, and rate of rise of inspiratory activity. Phrenic output recovered gradually to control levels following an exponential time course. These effects varied as a function of the duration of SLN stimulation. Naloxone administration (0.8 mg/kg iv) significantly reduced the duration of poststimulatory apnea and attenuated the depression of phrenic minute output of the first

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 1995

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