Muscle damage induced by eccentric contractions of 25% strain

Muscle damage induced by eccentric contractions of 25% strain perimental treatments and to measure the morphological properties of the various fiber types treatment. We hypothesized that a fiber-type-specific response to treatment would be observed. We also hypothesized that the tension-time course observed during the three treatments would differ both quantitatively and qualitatively and might provide insight into the timing of EC-induced . METHODS Isometric Passive Stretch The model chosen for this study was the tibialis anterior (TA) of the New Zealand White rabbit. We chose to study the TA because it is accessible and possesses longitudinal fiber architecture (pennation angle of 3”, fiber length-to- length ratio of 0.67, Ref. 23). Thus the stress resulting from EC would be applied normally to the fiber cross section, avoiding shear forces and complicating data interpretation. Also the TA fiber type distribution [45% fast-twitch glycolytic (FG), 45% fasttwitch oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), 10% slow-twitch oxidative (SO); Ref. 241 is similar to many locomotory s. Finally, because TA fibers extend -70% of the length, cross sections taken from the midbelly contain all fibers, avoiding sampling problems (38). Measurement of contractile properties. To measure contractile function, rabbits were first anesthetized with a subcutaneous injection of a ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine cocktail (50, 5, and 1 mg/kg body mass, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Muscle damage induced by eccentric contractions of 25% strain

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
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Abstract

perimental treatments and to measure the morphological properties of the various fiber types treatment. We hypothesized that a fiber-type-specific response to treatment would be observed. We also hypothesized that the tension-time course observed during the three treatments would differ both quantitatively and qualitatively and might provide insight into the timing of EC-induced . METHODS Isometric Passive Stretch The model chosen for this study was the tibialis anterior (TA) of the New Zealand White rabbit. We chose to study the TA because it is accessible and possesses longitudinal fiber architecture (pennation angle of 3”, fiber length-to- length ratio of 0.67, Ref. 23). Thus the stress resulting from EC would be applied normally to the fiber cross section, avoiding shear forces and complicating data interpretation. Also the TA fiber type distribution [45% fast-twitch glycolytic (FG), 45% fasttwitch oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), 10% slow-twitch oxidative (SO); Ref. 241 is similar to many locomotory s. Finally, because TA fibers extend -70% of the length, cross sections taken from the midbelly contain all fibers, avoiding sampling problems (38). Measurement of contractile properties. To measure contractile function, rabbits were first anesthetized with a subcutaneous injection of a ketamine-xylazine-acepromazine cocktail (50, 5, and 1 mg/kg body mass,

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jun 1, 1991

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