Muscle cytoskeletal disruption occurs within the first 15 min of cyclic eccentric contraction

Muscle cytoskeletal disruption occurs within the first 15 min of cyclic eccentric contraction STRUCTURAL DAMAGE after forced lengthening ( ) has been reported in a number of different muscles and experimental models (7, 14, 20, 33). Such muscle actions are relatively common normal movement when, for example, the quadriceps are forced to lengthen as the foot strikes the ground. Postexercise degenerative responses reported include fiber necrosis (17), sublethal damage of contractile and components (6, 20>, and of membranous components such as mitochondria that show paracrystalline inclusions (8). Recently, we measured muscle tension cyclic and compared it with the muscle tension measured cyclic passive stretch and isometric (14). We found that the added mechanical tension due to (calculated as the difference between tension and the sum of isometric tension and passive stretch tension; Fig. 1) disappeared -7 min into the MUSCLE 278 0161-7567/96 $5.00 Copyright paradigm. We interpreted this result to indicate that significant mechanical events unique to occurred early in the exercise session. This finding was supported by demonstrating histological abnormalities in muscle fibers with very low oxidative capacity (type fast glycolytic fibers), which would be expected to fatigue early in the treatment period (12). Despite these early mechanical changes, the hypothesis that muscle structural damage occurs within the first few http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Muscle cytoskeletal disruption occurs within the first 15 min of cyclic eccentric contraction

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-american-physiological-society/muscle-cytoskeletal-disruption-occurs-within-the-first-15-min-of-1I8PMGpsnP
Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

STRUCTURAL DAMAGE after forced lengthening ( ) has been reported in a number of different muscles and experimental models (7, 14, 20, 33). Such muscle actions are relatively common normal movement when, for example, the quadriceps are forced to lengthen as the foot strikes the ground. Postexercise degenerative responses reported include fiber necrosis (17), sublethal damage of contractile and components (6, 20>, and of membranous components such as mitochondria that show paracrystalline inclusions (8). Recently, we measured muscle tension cyclic and compared it with the muscle tension measured cyclic passive stretch and isometric (14). We found that the added mechanical tension due to (calculated as the difference between tension and the sum of isometric tension and passive stretch tension; Fig. 1) disappeared -7 min into the MUSCLE 278 0161-7567/96 $5.00 Copyright paradigm. We interpreted this result to indicate that significant mechanical events unique to occurred early in the exercise session. This finding was supported by demonstrating histological abnormalities in muscle fibers with very low oxidative capacity (type fast glycolytic fibers), which would be expected to fatigue early in the treatment period (12). Despite these early mechanical changes, the hypothesis that muscle structural damage occurs within the first few

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1996

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off