Monocarboxylic acid transporters, MCT1 and MCT2, in cortical astrocytes in vitro and in vivo

Monocarboxylic acid transporters, MCT1 and MCT2, in cortical astrocytes in vitro and in vivo Abstract We used sequence-specific antibodies to characterize two monocarboxylic acid transporters, MCT1 and MCT2, in astrocytes. Both proteins are expressed in primary cultures of cortical astrocytes, as indicated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Both MCT1 and MCT2 are present in small, punctate structures in the cytoplasm and at the cell membrane. Cells showing very low levels of labeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) also label more dimly for MCT2, but not for MCT1. In vivo, double-label immunofluorescence studies coupled with confocal microscopy indicate that MCT1 and MCT2 are rare in astrocytes in the cortex. However, they are specifically labeled in astrocytes of the glial limiting membrane and in white matter tracts. Both transporters are also present in the microvasculature. Comparison of labeling for MCT1 and MCT2 with markers of the blood-brain barrier shows that the transporters are not always limited to the astrocytic endfeet in vivo. Our results suggest that the level of expression of monocarboxylic acid transporters MCT1 and MCT2 by cortical astrocytes in vivo is significantly lower than in vitro but that astrocytes in some other regions of the brain can express one or both proteins in significant amounts. blood-brain barrier immunofluorescence plasma membrane lactate Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: R. J. Bloch, 660 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, MD 21201 (E-mail: rbloch@umaryland.edu ). This research was supported by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant PO1-HD-16596. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2000 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Cell Physiology The American Physiological Society

Monocarboxylic acid transporters, MCT1 and MCT2, in cortical astrocytes in vitro and in vivo

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6143
eISSN
1522-1563
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract We used sequence-specific antibodies to characterize two monocarboxylic acid transporters, MCT1 and MCT2, in astrocytes. Both proteins are expressed in primary cultures of cortical astrocytes, as indicated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Both MCT1 and MCT2 are present in small, punctate structures in the cytoplasm and at the cell membrane. Cells showing very low levels of labeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) also label more dimly for MCT2, but not for MCT1. In vivo, double-label immunofluorescence studies coupled with confocal microscopy indicate that MCT1 and MCT2 are rare in astrocytes in the cortex. However, they are specifically labeled in astrocytes of the glial limiting membrane and in white matter tracts. Both transporters are also present in the microvasculature. Comparison of labeling for MCT1 and MCT2 with markers of the blood-brain barrier shows that the transporters are not always limited to the astrocytic endfeet in vivo. Our results suggest that the level of expression of monocarboxylic acid transporters MCT1 and MCT2 by cortical astrocytes in vivo is significantly lower than in vitro but that astrocytes in some other regions of the brain can express one or both proteins in significant amounts. blood-brain barrier immunofluorescence plasma membrane lactate Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: R. J. Bloch, 660 W. Redwood St., Baltimore, MD 21201 (E-mail: rbloch@umaryland.edu ). This research was supported by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant PO1-HD-16596. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2000 the American Physiological Society

Journal

AJP - Cell PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: May 1, 2000

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