Monocarboxylate transporter expression in mouse brain

Monocarboxylate transporter expression in mouse brain Abstract Although glucose is the major metabolic fuel needed for normal brain function, monocarboxylic acids, i.e., lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies, can also be utilized by the brain as alternative energy substrates. In most mammalian cells, these substrates are transported either into or out of the cell by a family of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), first cloned and sequenced in the hamster. We have recently cloned two MCT isoforms (MCT1 and MCT2) from a mouse kidney cDNA library. Northern blot analysis revealed that MCT1 mRNA is ubiquitous and can be detected in most tissues at a relatively constant level. MCT2 expression is more limited, with high levels of expression confined to testes, kidney, stomach, and liver and lower levels in lung, brain, and epididymal fat. Both MCT1 mRNA and MCT2 mRNA are detected in mouse brain using antisense riboprobes and in situ hybridization. MCT1 mRNA is found throughout the cortex, with higher levels of hybridization in hippocampus and cerebellum. MCT2 mRNA was detected in the same areas, but the pattern of expression was more specific. In addition, MCT1 mRNA, but not MCT2, is localized to the choroid plexus, ependyma, microvessels, and white matter structures such as the corpus callosum. These results suggest a differential expression of the two MCTs at the cellular level. monocarboxylate transporter-1 monocarboxylate transporter-2 cDNA sequences in situ hybridization Footnotes Address for reprint requests: E. M. Koehler-Stec, EDMNS/DB/NIDDK/NIH, Bdg. 10, Rm. 5N102, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1420, Bethesda, MD 20892-1420. This work was supported by grants from National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (to E. M. Koehler-Stec and I. A. Simpson), National Institutes of Health Grant HD-31521, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International Grant 196125 (to S. J. Vannucci), and the Charles E.Culpeper Foundation (K. T. Landschulz and W. H. Landschulz). A preliminary report of data was presented at the Society for Neuroscience Meeting, New Orleans, LA, October 25–30, 1997. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. 1 While this article was under review, a paper was published describing the expression of MCT mRNAs in mouse brain (L. Pellerin, G. Pellegri, J.-L. Martin, and P. J. Magistretti. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95: 3990–3995, 1998). Copyright © 1998 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Endocrinology and Metabolism The American Physiological Society

Monocarboxylate transporter expression in mouse brain

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The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0193-1849
eISSN
1522-1555
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Abstract

Abstract Although glucose is the major metabolic fuel needed for normal brain function, monocarboxylic acids, i.e., lactate, pyruvate, and ketone bodies, can also be utilized by the brain as alternative energy substrates. In most mammalian cells, these substrates are transported either into or out of the cell by a family of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), first cloned and sequenced in the hamster. We have recently cloned two MCT isoforms (MCT1 and MCT2) from a mouse kidney cDNA library. Northern blot analysis revealed that MCT1 mRNA is ubiquitous and can be detected in most tissues at a relatively constant level. MCT2 expression is more limited, with high levels of expression confined to testes, kidney, stomach, and liver and lower levels in lung, brain, and epididymal fat. Both MCT1 mRNA and MCT2 mRNA are detected in mouse brain using antisense riboprobes and in situ hybridization. MCT1 mRNA is found throughout the cortex, with higher levels of hybridization in hippocampus and cerebellum. MCT2 mRNA was detected in the same areas, but the pattern of expression was more specific. In addition, MCT1 mRNA, but not MCT2, is localized to the choroid plexus, ependyma, microvessels, and white matter structures such as the corpus callosum. These results suggest a differential expression of the two MCTs at the cellular level. monocarboxylate transporter-1 monocarboxylate transporter-2 cDNA sequences in situ hybridization Footnotes Address for reprint requests: E. M. Koehler-Stec, EDMNS/DB/NIDDK/NIH, Bdg. 10, Rm. 5N102, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1420, Bethesda, MD 20892-1420. This work was supported by grants from National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (to E. M. Koehler-Stec and I. A. Simpson), National Institutes of Health Grant HD-31521, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International Grant 196125 (to S. J. Vannucci), and the Charles E.Culpeper Foundation (K. T. Landschulz and W. H. Landschulz). A preliminary report of data was presented at the Society for Neuroscience Meeting, New Orleans, LA, October 25–30, 1997. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. 1 While this article was under review, a paper was published describing the expression of MCT mRNAs in mouse brain (L. Pellerin, G. Pellegri, J.-L. Martin, and P. J. Magistretti. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95: 3990–3995, 1998). Copyright © 1998 the American Physiological Society

Journal

AJP - Endocrinology and MetabolismThe American Physiological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1998

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