MECHANISM OF SPREADING CORTICAL DEPRESSION

MECHANISM OF SPREADING CORTICAL DEPRESSION CORTICAL University, June 1 Canada Department of Physiology, (Received for McGill publication MontreuL, 8, 1955) INTROD UCTI ON SPREADING , which results from strong stimulation of the cerebral cortex, was first described by LeZo in 1944 (15). In the intact brain of rabbits, cats, or monkeys, this phenomenon manifests itself in the disappearance of the spontaneous electrical activity of the cortex, starting at the stimulated point, and spreading in all directions over the cortex at the rate of about 3 mm./min. (26, 23, 27). Simultaneously, all cortical responses to electrical and physiological stimulation disappear, and a large potential gradient develops across the cortical grey matter, as a result of which the surface of the cortex becomes first negative with respect to an indifferent cortical point and then positive (17). The negative phase attains an amplitude of 3-E mV., and the positive phase is usually considerably smaller. Sometimes the negative wave is also preceded by a small positive deflection. These slow potential changes last for several minutes at any one point, and the spontaneous electri .cal activi ty of the cortex does not return to normal for several minutes after these than ges have disappeared It has been found http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurophysiology The American Physiological Society

MECHANISM OF SPREADING CORTICAL DEPRESSION

Journal of Neurophysiology, Volume 19: 154 – Mar 1, 1956

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3077
eISSN
1522-1598
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CORTICAL University, June 1 Canada Department of Physiology, (Received for McGill publication MontreuL, 8, 1955) INTROD UCTI ON SPREADING , which results from strong stimulation of the cerebral cortex, was first described by LeZo in 1944 (15). In the intact brain of rabbits, cats, or monkeys, this phenomenon manifests itself in the disappearance of the spontaneous electrical activity of the cortex, starting at the stimulated point, and spreading in all directions over the cortex at the rate of about 3 mm./min. (26, 23, 27). Simultaneously, all cortical responses to electrical and physiological stimulation disappear, and a large potential gradient develops across the cortical grey matter, as a result of which the surface of the cortex becomes first negative with respect to an indifferent cortical point and then positive (17). The negative phase attains an amplitude of 3-E mV., and the positive phase is usually considerably smaller. Sometimes the negative wave is also preceded by a small positive deflection. These slow potential changes last for several minutes at any one point, and the spontaneous electri .cal activi ty of the cortex does not return to normal for several minutes after these than ges have disappeared It has been found

Journal

Journal of NeurophysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1956

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