Interaction between CCK and opioids in the modulation of the rectocolonic inhibitory reflex in rats

Interaction between CCK and opioids in the modulation of the rectocolonic inhibitory reflex in rats MATERIAL METHODS ENHANCED ABDOMINAL PAIN colonic disturbances associated with altered bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or both) are commonly observed in patients with irritable bowel disorders (1). Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) exhibit an enhanced sensitivity to rectal distension evidenced by a lower threshold of pain perception (29,34). Cholecystokinin (CCK), first recognized as a gastrointestinal hormone, was later discovered in very high concentration in the brain. Among the several forms of CCK, the sulfated octapeptide COOH terminus, is the most predominant form in the central nervous system (CNS) (32). CCK receptors are divided into two classes, CCK-A (alimentary) CCK-B (brain) receptors (10, 26); CCK-A receptors are located primarily in the periphery but also have been identified in discrete regions of the brain, including nucleus accumbens, central nucleus of amygdala, medial nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), area postrema, the vagus nerve (4,10,15). Anatomical studies show that enkephalins CCK-8 have similar distribution within the brain spinal cord (8, 12, 31) suggesting a possible role of CCK in nociception. CCK-8 possesses naloxone-reversible ana tinociceptive effect in several analgesimetric tests, such as the hot plate, writhing, tail-flick tests (2, 3, 16, G240 0193~1857/95 $3.00 Copyright AnimaZs. Four groups of eight http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology The American Physiological Society

Interaction between CCK and opioids in the modulation of the rectocolonic inhibitory reflex in rats

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0193-1857
eISSN
1522-1547
Publisher site
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Abstract

MATERIAL METHODS ENHANCED ABDOMINAL PAIN colonic disturbances associated with altered bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or both) are commonly observed in patients with irritable bowel disorders (1). Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) exhibit an enhanced sensitivity to rectal distension evidenced by a lower threshold of pain perception (29,34). Cholecystokinin (CCK), first recognized as a gastrointestinal hormone, was later discovered in very high concentration in the brain. Among the several forms of CCK, the sulfated octapeptide COOH terminus, is the most predominant form in the central nervous system (CNS) (32). CCK receptors are divided into two classes, CCK-A (alimentary) CCK-B (brain) receptors (10, 26); CCK-A receptors are located primarily in the periphery but also have been identified in discrete regions of the brain, including nucleus accumbens, central nucleus of amygdala, medial nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), area postrema, the vagus nerve (4,10,15). Anatomical studies show that enkephalins CCK-8 have similar distribution within the brain spinal cord (8, 12, 31) suggesting a possible role of CCK in nociception. CCK-8 possesses naloxone-reversible ana tinociceptive effect in several analgesimetric tests, such as the hot plate, writhing, tail-flick tests (2, 3, 16, G240 0193~1857/95 $3.00 Copyright AnimaZs. Four groups of eight

Journal

AJP - Gastrointestinal and Liver PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Aug 1, 1995

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