Insulin infusion induces endothelin-1-dependent hypertension in rats

Insulin infusion induces endothelin-1-dependent hypertension in rats We previously showed that chronic insulin infusion induces insulin resistance, hyperendothelinemia, and hypertension in rats (C. C. Juan, V. S. Fang, C. F. Kwok, J. C. Perng, Y. C. Chou, and L. T. Ho. Metabolism 48: 465–471, 1999). Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, is suggested to play an important role in maintaining vascular tone and regulating blood pressure, and insulin increases ET-1 production in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, BQ-610, a selective endothelin A receptor antagonist, was used to examine the role of ET-1 in insulin-induced hypertension in rats. BQ-610 (0.7 mg/ml; 0.5 ml/kg body wt) or normal saline was given intraperitoneally two times daily for 25 days to groups of rats infused with either saline or insulin (2 U/day via sc-implanted osmotic pumps), and changes in plasma levels of insulin, glucose, and ET-1 and the systolic blood pressure were measured over the experimental period, whereas changes in insulin sensitivity were examined at the end of the experimental period. Plasma insulin and ET-1 levels were measured by RIA, plasma glucose levels using a glucose analyzer, systolic blood pressure by the tail-cuff method, and insulin sensitivity by an oral glucose tolerance test. Our studies showed that insulin infusion caused sustained hyperinsulinemia in both saline- and BQ-610-injected rats over the infusion period. After pump implantation (2 wk), the systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in insulin-infused rats than in saline-infused rats in the saline-injected group (133 ± 3.1 vs. 113 ± 1.1 mmHg, P < 0.05) but not in the BQ-610-injected group (117 ± 1.2 vs. 117 ± 1.8 mmHg). Plasma ET-1 levels in both sets of insulin-infused rats were higher than in saline-infused controls (2.5 ± 0.6 and 2.5 ± 0.8 vs. 1.8 ± 0.4 and 1.7 ± 0.3 pmol/l, P < 0.05). Oral glucose tolerance tests showed that BQ-610 treatment did not prevent the insulin resistance caused by chronic insulin infusion. No significant changes were found in insulin sensitivity and blood pressure in saline-infused rats treated with BQ-610. In a separate experiment, insulin infusion induced the increase in arterial ET-1 content, hypertension, and subsequent plasma ET-1 elevation in rats. These results suggest that, in the insulin infusion rat model, ET-1 plays a mediating role in the development of hypertension, but not of insulin resistance. hyperinsulinemia; insulin resistance; endothelin A receptor Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: L.-T. Ho, Dept. of Medical Research & Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No.201, Sec. 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China (E-mail: ltho@vghtpe.gov.tw ) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Endocrinology and Metabolism The American Physiological Society

Insulin infusion induces endothelin-1-dependent hypertension in rats

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0193-1849
eISSN
1522-1555
DOI
10.1152/ajpendo.00536.2003
Publisher site
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Abstract

We previously showed that chronic insulin infusion induces insulin resistance, hyperendothelinemia, and hypertension in rats (C. C. Juan, V. S. Fang, C. F. Kwok, J. C. Perng, Y. C. Chou, and L. T. Ho. Metabolism 48: 465–471, 1999). Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, is suggested to play an important role in maintaining vascular tone and regulating blood pressure, and insulin increases ET-1 production in vivo and in vitro. In the present study, BQ-610, a selective endothelin A receptor antagonist, was used to examine the role of ET-1 in insulin-induced hypertension in rats. BQ-610 (0.7 mg/ml; 0.5 ml/kg body wt) or normal saline was given intraperitoneally two times daily for 25 days to groups of rats infused with either saline or insulin (2 U/day via sc-implanted osmotic pumps), and changes in plasma levels of insulin, glucose, and ET-1 and the systolic blood pressure were measured over the experimental period, whereas changes in insulin sensitivity were examined at the end of the experimental period. Plasma insulin and ET-1 levels were measured by RIA, plasma glucose levels using a glucose analyzer, systolic blood pressure by the tail-cuff method, and insulin sensitivity by an oral glucose tolerance test. Our studies showed that insulin infusion caused sustained hyperinsulinemia in both saline- and BQ-610-injected rats over the infusion period. After pump implantation (2 wk), the systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in insulin-infused rats than in saline-infused rats in the saline-injected group (133 ± 3.1 vs. 113 ± 1.1 mmHg, P < 0.05) but not in the BQ-610-injected group (117 ± 1.2 vs. 117 ± 1.8 mmHg). Plasma ET-1 levels in both sets of insulin-infused rats were higher than in saline-infused controls (2.5 ± 0.6 and 2.5 ± 0.8 vs. 1.8 ± 0.4 and 1.7 ± 0.3 pmol/l, P < 0.05). Oral glucose tolerance tests showed that BQ-610 treatment did not prevent the insulin resistance caused by chronic insulin infusion. No significant changes were found in insulin sensitivity and blood pressure in saline-infused rats treated with BQ-610. In a separate experiment, insulin infusion induced the increase in arterial ET-1 content, hypertension, and subsequent plasma ET-1 elevation in rats. These results suggest that, in the insulin infusion rat model, ET-1 plays a mediating role in the development of hypertension, but not of insulin resistance. hyperinsulinemia; insulin resistance; endothelin A receptor Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: L.-T. Ho, Dept. of Medical Research & Education, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No.201, Sec. 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China (E-mail: ltho@vghtpe.gov.tw )

Journal

AJP - Endocrinology and MetabolismThe American Physiological Society

Published: Nov 1, 2004

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