Hepatic glucokinase is induced by dietary carbohydrates in rainbow trout, gilthead seabream, and common carp

Hepatic glucokinase is induced by dietary carbohydrates in rainbow trout, gilthead seabream, and... Abstract Glucokinase (GK) plays a central role in glucose homeostasis in mammals. The absence of an inducible GK has been suggested to explain the poor utilization of dietary carbohydrates in rainbow trout. In this context, we analyzed GK expression in three fish species (rainbow trout , gilthead seabream, and common carp) known to differ in regard to their dietary carbohydrate tolerance. Fish were fed for 10 wk with either a diet containing a high level of digestible starch (>20%) or a diet totally deprived of starch. Our data demonstrate an induction of GK gene expression and GK activity by dietary carbohydrates in all three species. These studies strongly suggest that low dietary carbohydrate utilization in rainbow trout is not due to the absence of inducible hepatic GK as previously suggested. Interestingly, we also observed a significantly lower GK expression in common carp (a glucose-tolerant fish) than in rainbow trout and gilthead seabream, which are generally considered as glucose intolerant. These data suggest that other biochemical mechanisms are implicated in the inability of rainbow trout and gilthead seabream to control blood glucose closely. glucokinase expression fish nutrition Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. Panserat, Fish Nutrition Laboratory, INRA-IFREMER, 64310 St-Pée-sur-Nivelle, France (E-mail: panserat@st-pee.inra.fr ). This work was supported by the European Commission (Fisheries Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Research, Contract FAIR No. CT95–0174) and the Aquitaine Region (No. CCRRDT: 960308003). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2000 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

Hepatic glucokinase is induced by dietary carbohydrates in rainbow trout, gilthead seabream, and common carp

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-american-physiological-society/hepatic-glucokinase-is-induced-by-dietary-carbohydrates-in-rainbow-PYUG80xAq5
Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Glucokinase (GK) plays a central role in glucose homeostasis in mammals. The absence of an inducible GK has been suggested to explain the poor utilization of dietary carbohydrates in rainbow trout. In this context, we analyzed GK expression in three fish species (rainbow trout , gilthead seabream, and common carp) known to differ in regard to their dietary carbohydrate tolerance. Fish were fed for 10 wk with either a diet containing a high level of digestible starch (>20%) or a diet totally deprived of starch. Our data demonstrate an induction of GK gene expression and GK activity by dietary carbohydrates in all three species. These studies strongly suggest that low dietary carbohydrate utilization in rainbow trout is not due to the absence of inducible hepatic GK as previously suggested. Interestingly, we also observed a significantly lower GK expression in common carp (a glucose-tolerant fish) than in rainbow trout and gilthead seabream, which are generally considered as glucose intolerant. These data suggest that other biochemical mechanisms are implicated in the inability of rainbow trout and gilthead seabream to control blood glucose closely. glucokinase expression fish nutrition Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: S. Panserat, Fish Nutrition Laboratory, INRA-IFREMER, 64310 St-Pée-sur-Nivelle, France (E-mail: panserat@st-pee.inra.fr ). This work was supported by the European Commission (Fisheries Agricultural and Agro-Industrial Research, Contract FAIR No. CT95–0174) and the Aquitaine Region (No. CCRRDT: 960308003). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2000 the American Physiological Society

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: May 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off