Glucose kinetics during high-intensity exercise and the crossover concept

Glucose kinetics during high-intensity exercise and the crossover concept Coggan, Andrew R., Comasia A. Raguso, Bradley D. Williams, Labros S. Sidossis, and Amalia Gastaldelli. Glucose kinetics during high-intensity exercise in endurancetrained and untrained humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(3): 1203-1207, 1995.-In humans, endurance training reduces the rates of glucose production and utilization during moderate-intensity exercise. It is uncertain, however, whether this is also true during high-intensity exercise. Accordingly, we studied eight endurance-trained cyclists and eight untrained subjects during 30 min of cycling at -80% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO, max). Rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) were determined using a primed, continuous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose. Average glucose Ra during exercise did not differ in the trained and untrained subjects (34.3 t 3.6 vs. 36.0 t 1.7 pmol*minl*kg-l; mean t SE; P, not significant). Plasma insulin, glucagon, norepinephrine, and epinephrine concentrations were also similar in the two groups. In contrast, glucose Rd during exercise was 19% lower in the trained compared with the untrained subjects (27.0 t 2.6 vs. 33.2 t 1.5 umol*minl*kg-l; P < 0.001). Consequently, during exercise, plasma glucose concentration rose significantly (P < 0.05) in the trained subjects but did not change in the untrained subjects. We conclude that utilization of plasma glucose is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Glucose kinetics during high-intensity exercise and the crossover concept

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
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Abstract

Coggan, Andrew R., Comasia A. Raguso, Bradley D. Williams, Labros S. Sidossis, and Amalia Gastaldelli. Glucose kinetics during high-intensity exercise in endurancetrained and untrained humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(3): 1203-1207, 1995.-In humans, endurance training reduces the rates of glucose production and utilization during moderate-intensity exercise. It is uncertain, however, whether this is also true during high-intensity exercise. Accordingly, we studied eight endurance-trained cyclists and eight untrained subjects during 30 min of cycling at -80% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO, max). Rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) were determined using a primed, continuous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose. Average glucose Ra during exercise did not differ in the trained and untrained subjects (34.3 t 3.6 vs. 36.0 t 1.7 pmol*minl*kg-l; mean t SE; P, not significant). Plasma insulin, glucagon, norepinephrine, and epinephrine concentrations were also similar in the two groups. In contrast, glucose Rd during exercise was 19% lower in the trained compared with the untrained subjects (27.0 t 2.6 vs. 33.2 t 1.5 umol*minl*kg-l; P < 0.001). Consequently, during exercise, plasma glucose concentration rose significantly (P < 0.05) in the trained subjects but did not change in the untrained subjects. We conclude that utilization of plasma glucose is

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Mar 1, 1996

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