Gender differences in muscle inflammation after eccentric exercise

Gender differences in muscle inflammation after eccentric exercise Abstract Unaccustomed exercise is followed by delayed-onset muscle soreness and morphological changes in skeletal muscle. Animal studies have demonstrated that women have an attenuated response to muscle damage. We studied the effect of eccentric exercise in untrained male ( n = 8) and female ( n = 8) subjects using a unilateral exercise design exercise (Ex) and control (Con) legs. Plasma granulocyte counts before (Pre) and 48 h after exercise (+48h) and creatine kinase activity Pre, 24 h after exercise (+24h), +48h, and 6 days after exercise (+6d) were determined before (Pre) and after (+24h, +48h, +6d) exercise, with biopsies taken from the vastus lateralis of each leg at +48h for determination of muscle damage and/or inflammation. Plasma granulocyte counts increased for men and decreased for women at +48h ( P < 0.05), and creatine kinase activity increased for both genders at +48h and +6d ( P < 0.01). There were significantly greater areas of both focal ( P < 0.001) and extensive ( P < 0.01) damage in the Ex vs. Con leg for both genders, which was assessed by using toluidine blue staining. The number of leukocyte common antigen-positive cells/mm 2 tissue increased with exercise ( P < 0.05), and men tended to show more in their Ex vs. Con leg compared with women ( P = 0.052). Men had a greater total (Ex and Con legs) number of bcl-2-positive cells/mm 2 tissue vs. women ( P < 0.05). Atrophic fibers with homogeneous bcl-2-positive staining were seen only in men ( n = 3). We conclude that muscle damage is similar between genders, yet the inflammatory response is attenuated in women vs. men. Finally, exercise may stimulate the expression of proteins involved in apoptosis in skeletal muscle. apoptosis sex differences bcl-2 Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: M. A. Tarnopolsky, Dept. of Medicine and Kinesiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Center, Rm. 4U4, 1200 Main St. W., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5 (E-mail: tarnopol@mcmaster.ca ). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2000 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Gender differences in muscle inflammation after eccentric exercise

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
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Abstract

Abstract Unaccustomed exercise is followed by delayed-onset muscle soreness and morphological changes in skeletal muscle. Animal studies have demonstrated that women have an attenuated response to muscle damage. We studied the effect of eccentric exercise in untrained male ( n = 8) and female ( n = 8) subjects using a unilateral exercise design exercise (Ex) and control (Con) legs. Plasma granulocyte counts before (Pre) and 48 h after exercise (+48h) and creatine kinase activity Pre, 24 h after exercise (+24h), +48h, and 6 days after exercise (+6d) were determined before (Pre) and after (+24h, +48h, +6d) exercise, with biopsies taken from the vastus lateralis of each leg at +48h for determination of muscle damage and/or inflammation. Plasma granulocyte counts increased for men and decreased for women at +48h ( P < 0.05), and creatine kinase activity increased for both genders at +48h and +6d ( P < 0.01). There were significantly greater areas of both focal ( P < 0.001) and extensive ( P < 0.01) damage in the Ex vs. Con leg for both genders, which was assessed by using toluidine blue staining. The number of leukocyte common antigen-positive cells/mm 2 tissue increased with exercise ( P < 0.05), and men tended to show more in their Ex vs. Con leg compared with women ( P = 0.052). Men had a greater total (Ex and Con legs) number of bcl-2-positive cells/mm 2 tissue vs. women ( P < 0.05). Atrophic fibers with homogeneous bcl-2-positive staining were seen only in men ( n = 3). We conclude that muscle damage is similar between genders, yet the inflammatory response is attenuated in women vs. men. Finally, exercise may stimulate the expression of proteins involved in apoptosis in skeletal muscle. apoptosis sex differences bcl-2 Footnotes Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: M. A. Tarnopolsky, Dept. of Medicine and Kinesiology, McMaster Univ. Medical Center, Rm. 4U4, 1200 Main St. W., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8N 3Z5 (E-mail: tarnopol@mcmaster.ca ). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 2000 the American Physiological Society

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Dec 1, 2000

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