Eye movements evoked by stimulation of frontal eye fields

Eye movements evoked by stimulation of frontal eye fields Eve - 1874 E’EKRIKR (4) elicited conjugate contralateral eye in the monkey by stimulating the cortical area now known as the eye (Rrodmann’s area 8). The many subsequent studies of this phenomenon have been reviewed by Smith (22) in 1949 Crosby, Yoss, Henderson (3) in 1952. The usual response to electrical stimulation was a slow rotation of both eyes to the opposite side with an occasional up or down component. Other types of that have been observed are centering (l), vergence (3), nystagmus (22). Several cortical maps showed areas on the cortex where these various types of could be produced but there was little agreement among them. Most of these studies suffered from three limitations: 1,) the animals were under light anesthesia which is known to affect the ; 2) stimulus intensity was usually unreported, ?) eye were not objectively recorded. In 1958 Krieger, Wagman, Bender (10) reported the effects of anesthesia on cortically evoked eye . Although they did not record eye , they reported (24) that stimulation of the eye of the unanesthetized monkey usually produced the rapid eye called saccades. In 1966 we developed a method for accurately recording vertical horizontal eye movement chronically in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurophysiology The American Physiological Society

Eye movements evoked by stimulation of frontal eye fields

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-american-physiological-society/eye-movements-evoked-by-stimulation-of-frontal-eye-fields-dWQReIhU51
Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3077
eISSN
1522-1598
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Eve - 1874 E’EKRIKR (4) elicited conjugate contralateral eye in the monkey by stimulating the cortical area now known as the eye (Rrodmann’s area 8). The many subsequent studies of this phenomenon have been reviewed by Smith (22) in 1949 Crosby, Yoss, Henderson (3) in 1952. The usual response to electrical stimulation was a slow rotation of both eyes to the opposite side with an occasional up or down component. Other types of that have been observed are centering (l), vergence (3), nystagmus (22). Several cortical maps showed areas on the cortex where these various types of could be produced but there was little agreement among them. Most of these studies suffered from three limitations: 1,) the animals were under light anesthesia which is known to affect the ; 2) stimulus intensity was usually unreported, ?) eye were not objectively recorded. In 1958 Krieger, Wagman, Bender (10) reported the effects of anesthesia on cortically evoked eye . Although they did not record eye , they reported (24) that stimulation of the eye of the unanesthetized monkey usually produced the rapid eye called saccades. In 1966 we developed a method for accurately recording vertical horizontal eye movement chronically in

Journal

Journal of NeurophysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1969

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off