Exercise regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle

Exercise regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle Abstract Exercise increases the rate of glucose uptake into the contracting skeletal muscles. This effect of exercise is similar to the action of insulin on glucose uptake, and the mechanism through which both stimuli increase skeletal muscle glucose uptake involves the translocation of GLUT-4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane and transverse tubules. Most studies suggest that exercise and insulin recruit distinct GLUT-4-containing vesicles and/or mobilize different “pools” of GLUT-4 proteins originating from unique intracellular locations. There are different intracellular signaling pathways that lead to insulin- and exercise-stimulated GLUT-4 translocation. Insulin utilizes a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism, whereas the exercise signal may be initiated by calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum leading to the activation of other signaling intermediaries, and there is also evidence for autocrine- or paracrine-mediated activation of transport. The period after exercise is characterized by increased sensitivity of muscle glucose uptake to insulin, which can be substantially prolonged in the face of carbohydrate deprivation. The ability of exercise to utilize insulin-independent mechanisms to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle has important clinical implications, especially for patients with diseases that are associated with peripheral insulin resistance, such as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. muscle contraction glucose transporters GLUT-4 calcium insulin Footnotes Address for reprint requests: L. J. Goodyear, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA 02215. Copyright © 1997 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Endocrinology and Metabolism The American Physiological Society

Exercise regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-american-physiological-society/exercise-regulation-of-glucose-transport-in-skeletal-muscle-8eEhPq3Jl1
Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0193-1849
eISSN
1522-1555
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Exercise increases the rate of glucose uptake into the contracting skeletal muscles. This effect of exercise is similar to the action of insulin on glucose uptake, and the mechanism through which both stimuli increase skeletal muscle glucose uptake involves the translocation of GLUT-4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane and transverse tubules. Most studies suggest that exercise and insulin recruit distinct GLUT-4-containing vesicles and/or mobilize different “pools” of GLUT-4 proteins originating from unique intracellular locations. There are different intracellular signaling pathways that lead to insulin- and exercise-stimulated GLUT-4 translocation. Insulin utilizes a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism, whereas the exercise signal may be initiated by calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum leading to the activation of other signaling intermediaries, and there is also evidence for autocrine- or paracrine-mediated activation of transport. The period after exercise is characterized by increased sensitivity of muscle glucose uptake to insulin, which can be substantially prolonged in the face of carbohydrate deprivation. The ability of exercise to utilize insulin-independent mechanisms to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle has important clinical implications, especially for patients with diseases that are associated with peripheral insulin resistance, such as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. muscle contraction glucose transporters GLUT-4 calcium insulin Footnotes Address for reprint requests: L. J. Goodyear, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA 02215. Copyright © 1997 the American Physiological Society

Journal

AJP - Endocrinology and MetabolismThe American Physiological Society

Published: Dec 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off