Exercise-induced muscle damage, repair, and adaptation in humans

Exercise-induced muscle damage, repair, and adaptation in humans CLARKSON, PRISCILLA M., AND ISABELLE TREMBLAY~Xw&e-induced and adaptation in humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 65( 1): l-6,1988.-This study examined and rapid adaptation. Eight college-age women performed three eccentric s of 70 maximal contracthe forearm flexors. One arm performed tions (70-MAX condition), and the other arm performed 24 maximal contractions (24-MAX) followed 2 wk later by 70 maximal contractions (70-MAXZ). Criterion measures of serum creatine kinase, soreness and pain, isometric strength, and shortening were assessed before, immediately after, and for 5 each , Significant changes in all criterion measures were found after the 70-MAX with a slow recovery that was not complete by day 5 after . The 24-MAX condition showed only small changes in the criterion measures. Changes in the criterion measures after the 70-MAX2 were significantly smaller than those after the ‘IO-MAX . Results from this study, with regard to the ability of the to adapt to suggest that an adaptation takes place such that the is more resistant to damage and any damage that does occur is repaired at a faster rate, It is also clear that a relatively small insult will produce this adaptation. eccentric ; soreness; serum creatine kinase Schwane and Armstrong (22) did not http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Exercise-induced muscle damage, repair, and adaptation in humans

Loading next page...
 
/lp/the-american-physiological-society/exercise-induced-muscle-damage-repair-and-adaptation-in-humans-2augzbp13x
Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CLARKSON, PRISCILLA M., AND ISABELLE TREMBLAY~Xw&e-induced and adaptation in humans. J. Appl. Physiol. 65( 1): l-6,1988.-This study examined and rapid adaptation. Eight college-age women performed three eccentric s of 70 maximal contracthe forearm flexors. One arm performed tions (70-MAX condition), and the other arm performed 24 maximal contractions (24-MAX) followed 2 wk later by 70 maximal contractions (70-MAXZ). Criterion measures of serum creatine kinase, soreness and pain, isometric strength, and shortening were assessed before, immediately after, and for 5 each , Significant changes in all criterion measures were found after the 70-MAX with a slow recovery that was not complete by day 5 after . The 24-MAX condition showed only small changes in the criterion measures. Changes in the criterion measures after the 70-MAX2 were significantly smaller than those after the ‘IO-MAX . Results from this study, with regard to the ability of the to adapt to suggest that an adaptation takes place such that the is more resistant to damage and any damage that does occur is repaired at a faster rate, It is also clear that a relatively small insult will produce this adaptation. eccentric ; soreness; serum creatine kinase Schwane and Armstrong (22) did not

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 1988

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month