Exercise, brain, and cognition across the life span

Exercise, brain, and cognition across the life span Abstract This is a brief review of current evidence for the relationships between physical activity and exercise and the brain and cognition throughout the life span in non-pathological populations. We focus on the effects of both aerobic and resistance training and provide a brief overview of potential neurobiological mechanisms derived from non-human animal models. Whereas research has focused primarily on the benefits of aerobic exercise in youth and young adult populations, there is growing evidence that both aerobic and resistance training are important for maintaining cognitive and brain health in old age. Finally, in these contexts, we point out gaps in the literature and future directions that will help advance the field of exercise neuroscience, including more studies that explicitly examine the effect of exercise type and intensity on cognition, the brain, and clinically significant outcomes. There is also a need for human neuroimaging studies to adopt a more unified multi-modal framework and for greater interaction between human and animal models of exercise effects on brain and cognition across the life span. physical activity aerobic training strength training brain function brain structure mental health Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print April 2011 , doi: 10.​1152/​japplphysiol.​00210.​2011 Journal of Applied Physiology November 2011 vol. 111 no. 5 1505-1513 » Abstract Free Full Text Free to you Full Text (PDF) Free to you All Versions of this Article: japplphysiol.00210.2011v1 111/5/1505 most recent Classifications Series: Physiology and Pathophysiology of Physical Inactivity Highlighted Topic Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Alert me when eletters are published Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Voss, M. W. Articles by Kramer, A. F. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Voss, M. W. Articles by Kramer, A. F. Related Content Load related web page information Current Issue November 2011, 111 (5) Alert me to new issues of Journal of Applied Physiology About the Journal Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Ethical Policies AuthorChoice PubMed Central Policy Reprints and Permissions Advertising Press Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society Print ISSN: 8750-7587 Online ISSN: 1522-1601 var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-2924550-1"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
DOI
10.1152/japplphysiol.00210.2011
pmid
21527670
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This is a brief review of current evidence for the relationships between physical activity and exercise and the brain and cognition throughout the life span in non-pathological populations. We focus on the effects of both aerobic and resistance training and provide a brief overview of potential neurobiological mechanisms derived from non-human animal models. Whereas research has focused primarily on the benefits of aerobic exercise in youth and young adult populations, there is growing evidence that both aerobic and resistance training are important for maintaining cognitive and brain health in old age. Finally, in these contexts, we point out gaps in the literature and future directions that will help advance the field of exercise neuroscience, including more studies that explicitly examine the effect of exercise type and intensity on cognition, the brain, and clinically significant outcomes. There is also a need for human neuroimaging studies to adopt a more unified multi-modal framework and for greater interaction between human and animal models of exercise effects on brain and cognition across the life span. physical activity aerobic training strength training brain function brain structure mental health Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print April 2011 , doi: 10.​1152/​japplphysiol.​00210.​2011 Journal of Applied Physiology November 2011 vol. 111 no. 5 1505-1513 » Abstract Free Full Text Free to you Full Text (PDF) Free to you All Versions of this Article: japplphysiol.00210.2011v1 111/5/1505 most recent Classifications Series: Physiology and Pathophysiology of Physical Inactivity Highlighted Topic Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Alert me when eletters are published Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Responses Submit a response No responses published Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Voss, M. W. Articles by Kramer, A. F. Search for related content PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Voss, M. W. Articles by Kramer, A. F. Related Content Load related web page information Current Issue November 2011, 111 (5) Alert me to new issues of Journal of Applied Physiology About the Journal Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Ethical Policies AuthorChoice PubMed Central Policy Reprints and Permissions Advertising Press Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society Print ISSN: 8750-7587 Online ISSN: 1522-1601 var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-2924550-1"); pageTracker._trackPageview();

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Nov 1, 2011

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