Electrical Influences and Speed of Chemical Change in the Brain

Electrical Influences and Speed of Chemical Change in the Brain HENRY McILWA From Department of Biochedtry, stitute of Psychiatry (British Postgraduate University of London), Maw&y ~osp&d, London, England Medical Federation, HEMICAL TEIE is large extent, is tricate, rapid, and closely connected with electrical phenomena. man under basal metabolic conditions, some20 per cent of oxygen taken up by body respiration is consumed . reviewg speedof one is thus concernedwith an appreciable proportion of energy metabolismof body: much of present account assesses respiration, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy-rich termediates of and of parts of ; it is especially concerned with manner which se metabolic characteristics are affected by experimentally applied electrical fluences. Or aspectsof speedof have been describedelsewhere(73). Vivo. Much quantitative formation on how level of cerebral metabolism varies with functional state of has come last decadefrom analysis of arterial and cerebral venous blood (51, 52, 73, 95). This has shown that a normal rate of cerebral oxygen consumption man or monkey, of somego &gm of /hr. (3.3-3.8 ml O&o gm/m.) can be reduced to about 55 pu/gm/hr. anessiaand can be creasedby convulsive agents. highest rate recorded was of 140 pM/gm/hr. durg convulsions duced by pentamethylenetetrazole. Respiration probably creased very promptly, for potentiometric measurements showeda rapid fall oxygen tension cerebral cortex http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physiological Reviews The American Physiological Society

Electrical Influences and Speed of Chemical Change in the Brain

Physiological Reviews, Volume 36: 355 – Jul 1, 1956

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0031-9333
eISSN
1522-1210
Publisher site
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Abstract

HENRY McILWA From Department of Biochedtry, stitute of Psychiatry (British Postgraduate University of London), Maw&y ~osp&d, London, England Medical Federation, HEMICAL TEIE is large extent, is tricate, rapid, and closely connected with electrical phenomena. man under basal metabolic conditions, some20 per cent of oxygen taken up by body respiration is consumed . reviewg speedof one is thus concernedwith an appreciable proportion of energy metabolismof body: much of present account assesses respiration, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy-rich termediates of and of parts of ; it is especially concerned with manner which se metabolic characteristics are affected by experimentally applied electrical fluences. Or aspectsof speedof have been describedelsewhere(73). Vivo. Much quantitative formation on how level of cerebral metabolism varies with functional state of has come last decadefrom analysis of arterial and cerebral venous blood (51, 52, 73, 95). This has shown that a normal rate of cerebral oxygen consumption man or monkey, of somego &gm of /hr. (3.3-3.8 ml O&o gm/m.) can be reduced to about 55 pu/gm/hr. anessiaand can be creasedby convulsive agents. highest rate recorded was of 140 pM/gm/hr. durg convulsions duced by pentamethylenetetrazole. Respiration probably creased very promptly, for potentiometric measurements showeda rapid fall oxygen tension cerebral cortex

Journal

Physiological ReviewsThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 1956

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