Effects of repeated eccentric contractions on structure and mechanical properties of toad sartorius muscle

Effects of repeated eccentric contractions on structure and mechanical properties of toad... focused on tension changes in muscle while the muscle is held at a fixed length (isometric) or is allowed to shorten (isotonic, concentric contraction). Rather fewer studies have been made of tension changes during an contraction, when a contracting muscle is forcibly lengthened, yet are common events in everyday life. Running downhill, horseback riding, and skiing all involve muscles being forcibly lengthened as they exert a braking action to control a movement. are of particular interest because it is well known that in untrained individuals exercise may lead to subsequent muscle soreness. It has been proposed that the soreness arises from damage to muscle fibers (1). How the damage comes about remains one of the challenging questions for exercise physiology. One hypothesis proposes that the initial event is mechanical (12). During an contraction, muscle fibers and their sarcomeres lengthen as they take up the stretch. One of us (12) has recently proposed that extension of active muscle at long lengths does not occur by uniform stretching of all sarcomeres, but as a rapid extension of sarcomeres, one at a time, in an ordered sequence from the weakest toward the strongest, resulting in development of an extremely nonuniform distribution http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Cell Physiology The American Physiological Society

Effects of repeated eccentric contractions on structure and mechanical properties of toad sartorius muscle

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6143
eISSN
1522-1563
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

focused on tension changes in muscle while the muscle is held at a fixed length (isometric) or is allowed to shorten (isotonic, concentric contraction). Rather fewer studies have been made of tension changes during an contraction, when a contracting muscle is forcibly lengthened, yet are common events in everyday life. Running downhill, horseback riding, and skiing all involve muscles being forcibly lengthened as they exert a braking action to control a movement. are of particular interest because it is well known that in untrained individuals exercise may lead to subsequent muscle soreness. It has been proposed that the soreness arises from damage to muscle fibers (1). How the damage comes about remains one of the challenging questions for exercise physiology. One hypothesis proposes that the initial event is mechanical (12). During an contraction, muscle fibers and their sarcomeres lengthen as they take up the stretch. One of us (12) has recently proposed that extension of active muscle at long lengths does not occur by uniform stretching of all sarcomeres, but as a rapid extension of sarcomeres, one at a time, in an ordered sequence from the weakest toward the strongest, resulting in development of an extremely nonuniform distribution

Journal

AJP - Cell PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1993

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