Effects of exercise training on subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in normal- and high-fat diet-fed rats

Effects of exercise training on subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in normal- and high-fat... Abstract Regular physical activity improves glucose tolerance and decreases adiposity. Our aim was to investigate the effects of exercise training on subcutaneous (inguinal) and visceral (parametrial) adipose tissue in rats that were fed a chow diet (13% fat) or made insulin resistant by a high-fat diet (60% fat). Sprague-Dawley rats performed 4 wk of voluntary wheel running or were kept as sedentary controls. The training groups fed chow and the high-fat diet achieved similar running distances (8.8 ± 1.8 and 9.3 ± 1.9 km/day, respectively). Training improved oral glucose tolerance in chow-fed rats and prevented the glucose intolerance that occurred in sedentary rats fed the high-fat diet. In both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, the high-fat diet-induced increases in fat pad weight (67% and 133%, respectively), adipocyte size (20% and 43%), and cell number (36% and 65%) were completely prevented by exercise training. Cytokine mRNA expression in visceral fat did not change with exercise training. However, in subcutaneous fat, training actually increased mRNA expression of several cytokines IL-6: 80% ( P < 0.05); TNF-α: 100% ( P < 0.05); IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra): 57% ( P = 0.08) with no detectable increases in serum cytokine concentrations. In summary, exercise training can overcome high-fat diet-induced impairments in glucose tolerance and increases in adipocyte size, cell number, and fat pad mass. Improved glucose tolerance was accompanied by an increase in cytokine gene expression in subcutaneous fat. This finding raises the possibility of a specific role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in adaptive responses to exercise training. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Endocrinology and Metabolism The American Physiological Society

Effects of exercise training on subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in normal- and high-fat diet-fed rats

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0193-1849
eISSN
1522-1555
D.O.I.
10.1152/ajpendo.90424.2008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Regular physical activity improves glucose tolerance and decreases adiposity. Our aim was to investigate the effects of exercise training on subcutaneous (inguinal) and visceral (parametrial) adipose tissue in rats that were fed a chow diet (13% fat) or made insulin resistant by a high-fat diet (60% fat). Sprague-Dawley rats performed 4 wk of voluntary wheel running or were kept as sedentary controls. The training groups fed chow and the high-fat diet achieved similar running distances (8.8 ± 1.8 and 9.3 ± 1.9 km/day, respectively). Training improved oral glucose tolerance in chow-fed rats and prevented the glucose intolerance that occurred in sedentary rats fed the high-fat diet. In both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, the high-fat diet-induced increases in fat pad weight (67% and 133%, respectively), adipocyte size (20% and 43%), and cell number (36% and 65%) were completely prevented by exercise training. Cytokine mRNA expression in visceral fat did not change with exercise training. However, in subcutaneous fat, training actually increased mRNA expression of several cytokines IL-6: 80% ( P < 0.05); TNF-α: 100% ( P < 0.05); IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra): 57% ( P = 0.08) with no detectable increases in serum cytokine concentrations. In summary, exercise training can overcome high-fat diet-induced impairments in glucose tolerance and increases in adipocyte size, cell number, and fat pad mass. Improved glucose tolerance was accompanied by an increase in cytokine gene expression in subcutaneous fat. This finding raises the possibility of a specific role of subcutaneous adipose tissue in adaptive responses to exercise training.

Journal

AJP - Endocrinology and MetabolismThe American Physiological Society

Published: Aug 1, 2009

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