Effects of eccentric exercise on the immune system in men

Effects of eccentric exercise on the immune system in men Abstract The effects of eccentric exercise on changes in numbers of circulating leukocytes, cell activation, cell adhesion, and cellular memory function were investigated in 12 men, aged 22–35 yr. The immunologic effects of postexercise epidermal treatment with monochromatic, infrared light were also evaluated. Blood was drawn before and 6, 24, and 48 h after exercise for phenotyping and analysis of creatine kinase activity. There was an increase in leukocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil number, no change in the number of basophils, eosinophils, B cells, and T cells, and a decrease in natural killer cell number postexercise. Some markers of lymphocyte and monocyte activation remained unchanged or decreased, whereas the expression of adhesion molecules 62L and 11b increased on monocytes. It is concluded that eccentric exercise induced decreased activation, and increased cell adhesion capacity, of monocytes. Altered trafficking of cells between lymphoid tissue and blood, selective apoptosis, or attachment/detachment from the endothelial wall can explain the observed phenotypic changes. Treatment with monochromatic, infrared light did not significantly affect any of the investigated variables. Correlations between immunologic and physiological parameters indicate a role of the immune system in adaptation to physical exercise. leukocytes muscle damage cell adhesion cell activation flow cytometry Footnotes Address for reprint requests: C. Malm, Dept. of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Box 5626, S-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden (E-mail: christer.malm@fyfa.ki.se ). This study was supported in part by Biolight International. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 1999 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Effects of eccentric exercise on the immune system in men

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
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Abstract

Abstract The effects of eccentric exercise on changes in numbers of circulating leukocytes, cell activation, cell adhesion, and cellular memory function were investigated in 12 men, aged 22–35 yr. The immunologic effects of postexercise epidermal treatment with monochromatic, infrared light were also evaluated. Blood was drawn before and 6, 24, and 48 h after exercise for phenotyping and analysis of creatine kinase activity. There was an increase in leukocyte, monocyte, and neutrophil number, no change in the number of basophils, eosinophils, B cells, and T cells, and a decrease in natural killer cell number postexercise. Some markers of lymphocyte and monocyte activation remained unchanged or decreased, whereas the expression of adhesion molecules 62L and 11b increased on monocytes. It is concluded that eccentric exercise induced decreased activation, and increased cell adhesion capacity, of monocytes. Altered trafficking of cells between lymphoid tissue and blood, selective apoptosis, or attachment/detachment from the endothelial wall can explain the observed phenotypic changes. Treatment with monochromatic, infrared light did not significantly affect any of the investigated variables. Correlations between immunologic and physiological parameters indicate a role of the immune system in adaptation to physical exercise. leukocytes muscle damage cell adhesion cell activation flow cytometry Footnotes Address for reprint requests: C. Malm, Dept. of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Box 5626, S-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden (E-mail: christer.malm@fyfa.ki.se ). This study was supported in part by Biolight International. The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. §1734 solely to indicate this fact. Copyright © 1999 the American Physiological Society

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Feb 1, 1999

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