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Determination of volumetric cerebrospinal fluid absorption into extracranial lymphatics in sheep

Determination of volumetric cerebrospinal fluid absorption into extracranial lymphatics in sheep Abstract We estimated the volumetric clearance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through arachnoid villi and extracranial lymphatics in conscious sheep. Catheters were inserted into both lateral ventricles, the cisterna magna, multiple cervical lymphatics, thoracic duct, and jugular vein. Uncannulated cervical vessels were ligated. 125 I-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) was administered into both lateral ventricles. 131 I-HSA was injected intravenously to permit calculation of plasma tracer loss and tracer recirculation into lymphatics. From mass balance equations, total volumetric absorption of CSF averaged 3.37 ± 0.38 ml/h, with 2.03 ± 0.29 ml/h (∼60%) removed by arachnoid villi and 1.35 ± 0.46 ml/h (∼40%) cleared by lymphatics. With projected estimates for noncannulated ducts, total CSF absorption increased to 3.89 ± 0.33 ml/h, with 1.86 ± 0.49 ml/h (48%) absorbed by lymphatics. Additionally, we calculated total CSF drainage to be 3.48 ± 0.52 ml/h, with 54 and 46% removed by arachnoid villi and lymphatics, respectively, using previously published mass transport data from our group. We employed estimates of CSF tracer concentrations that were extrapolated from relationships observed in the study reported here. We conclude that 40–48% of the total volume of CSF absorbed from the cranial compartment is removed by extracranial lymphatic vessels. cerebrospinal fluid drainage arachnoid villi brain spinal cord lymph nodes lymphatic vessels Footnotes Address for reprint requests: M. G. Johnston, Trauma Research Program and Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Toronto, Research Bldg., S-111, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5. This research was funded by the Medical Research Council of Canada. Copyright © 1998 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology The American Physiological Society

Determination of volumetric cerebrospinal fluid absorption into extracranial lymphatics in sheep

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6119
eISSN
1522-1490
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract We estimated the volumetric clearance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through arachnoid villi and extracranial lymphatics in conscious sheep. Catheters were inserted into both lateral ventricles, the cisterna magna, multiple cervical lymphatics, thoracic duct, and jugular vein. Uncannulated cervical vessels were ligated. 125 I-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) was administered into both lateral ventricles. 131 I-HSA was injected intravenously to permit calculation of plasma tracer loss and tracer recirculation into lymphatics. From mass balance equations, total volumetric absorption of CSF averaged 3.37 ± 0.38 ml/h, with 2.03 ± 0.29 ml/h (∼60%) removed by arachnoid villi and 1.35 ± 0.46 ml/h (∼40%) cleared by lymphatics. With projected estimates for noncannulated ducts, total CSF absorption increased to 3.89 ± 0.33 ml/h, with 1.86 ± 0.49 ml/h (48%) absorbed by lymphatics. Additionally, we calculated total CSF drainage to be 3.48 ± 0.52 ml/h, with 54 and 46% removed by arachnoid villi and lymphatics, respectively, using previously published mass transport data from our group. We employed estimates of CSF tracer concentrations that were extrapolated from relationships observed in the study reported here. We conclude that 40–48% of the total volume of CSF absorbed from the cranial compartment is removed by extracranial lymphatic vessels. cerebrospinal fluid drainage arachnoid villi brain spinal cord lymph nodes lymphatic vessels Footnotes Address for reprint requests: M. G. Johnston, Trauma Research Program and Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Toronto, Research Bldg., S-111, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5. This research was funded by the Medical Research Council of Canada. Copyright © 1998 the American Physiological Society

Journal

AJP - Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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