Decline running produces more sarcomeres in rat vastus intermedius muscle fibers than does incline running

Decline running produces more sarcomeres in rat vastus intermedius muscle fibers than does... IT HAS BEEN KNOWN 0161-7567/94 $3.00 Copyright time in order from the weakest to the strongest than by near-uniform lengthening sarcomeres. The term popping was chosen to emphasize that the lengthening was rapid and uncontrollable because an instantaneous instability produced by the decreasing length-tension curve and the flat force-velocity curve beyond the yield point observed in the lengthening part the curve. The theory predicted that the popped sarcomeres would be stretched to the point where the total active and passive tension equaled the total tension at the initial length. At least for frog muscle, this is beyond the region overlap between thick and thin filaments. This theory was able to explain many otherwise puzzling observations. Morgan (15) further suggested a mechanism for the damage contraction with the following steps. In a small proportion the overstretched sarcomeres, the filaments may fail to resume their interdigitating pattern on relaxation, leaving a sarcomere with less filament overlap and thus fewer active bridges than before. On the next stretch, this sarcomere will generate less tension and will thus pop early in the contraction, s neighboring sarcomeres. The process is then repeated on the next contraction, leading to the creation a patch poorly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Physiology The American Physiological Society

Decline running produces more sarcomeres in rat vastus intermedius muscle fibers than does incline running

Journal of Applied Physiology, Volume 77: 1439 – Sep 1, 1994

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
8750-7587
eISSN
1522-1601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IT HAS BEEN KNOWN 0161-7567/94 $3.00 Copyright time in order from the weakest to the strongest than by near-uniform lengthening sarcomeres. The term popping was chosen to emphasize that the lengthening was rapid and uncontrollable because an instantaneous instability produced by the decreasing length-tension curve and the flat force-velocity curve beyond the yield point observed in the lengthening part the curve. The theory predicted that the popped sarcomeres would be stretched to the point where the total active and passive tension equaled the total tension at the initial length. At least for frog muscle, this is beyond the region overlap between thick and thin filaments. This theory was able to explain many otherwise puzzling observations. Morgan (15) further suggested a mechanism for the damage contraction with the following steps. In a small proportion the overstretched sarcomeres, the filaments may fail to resume their interdigitating pattern on relaxation, leaving a sarcomere with less filament overlap and thus fewer active bridges than before. On the next stretch, this sarcomere will generate less tension and will thus pop early in the contraction, s neighboring sarcomeres. The process is then repeated on the next contraction, leading to the creation a patch poorly

Journal

Journal of Applied PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Sep 1, 1994

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