Cytokine response to eccentric exercise in young and elderly humans

Cytokine response to eccentric exercise in young and elderly humans Abstract To examine the plasma interleukin (IL)-6 response in elderly (E) and young (Y) humans, 10 E and 10 Y subjects completed 60 min of eccentric lower limb exercise at the same relative oxygen uptake. Plasma IL-6 was measured before, immediately after, and 5 days into recovery from exercise, as were the biochemical markers of muscle damage, creatine kinase (CK), and myoglobin. In both groups, IL-6 increased ( P < 0.05) immediately after exercise and peaked 4 h after exercise at 4.35 ± 1.7 vs. 5.05 ± 3.17 pg/ml for E and Y subjects, respectively. However, the increase in IL-6 in both groups was modest relative to the increases in CK peaking at 539 ± 413 vs. 10,301 ± 5,863 U/l for E and Y subjects, respectively. In addition, the increase in IL-6 was less pronounced ( P < 0.05) in E subjects compared with Y subjects. These results suggest that IL-6 increases progressively after eccentric exercise, suggesting that this increase is related to muscle damage. However, the modest increase in IL-6, despite large increases in CK, suggests that the IL-6 response to muscle damage does not make an important contribution to the large increase in IL-6 observed during concentric exercise of long duration. Our data also suggest that aging may be associated with impaired repair mechanisms for exercise-induced muscle damage. interleukin-6 tumor necrosis factor-α creatine kinase muscle damage muscle repair Footnotes This project was supported by The Danish National Research Foundation (no. 9900021) and The Danish Research Foundation (no. 514). Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: B. K. Pedersen, Dept. of Infectious Diseases, M7641, Rigshospitalet, Tagensvej 20, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark (E-mail: bkp@rh.dk ). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. 10.1152/ajpcell.00583.2001 Copyright © 2002 the American Physiological Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Cell Physiology The American Physiological Society

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0363-6143
eISSN
1522-1563
D.O.I.
10.1152/ajpcell.00583.2001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To examine the plasma interleukin (IL)-6 response in elderly (E) and young (Y) humans, 10 E and 10 Y subjects completed 60 min of eccentric lower limb exercise at the same relative oxygen uptake. Plasma IL-6 was measured before, immediately after, and 5 days into recovery from exercise, as were the biochemical markers of muscle damage, creatine kinase (CK), and myoglobin. In both groups, IL-6 increased ( P < 0.05) immediately after exercise and peaked 4 h after exercise at 4.35 ± 1.7 vs. 5.05 ± 3.17 pg/ml for E and Y subjects, respectively. However, the increase in IL-6 in both groups was modest relative to the increases in CK peaking at 539 ± 413 vs. 10,301 ± 5,863 U/l for E and Y subjects, respectively. In addition, the increase in IL-6 was less pronounced ( P < 0.05) in E subjects compared with Y subjects. These results suggest that IL-6 increases progressively after eccentric exercise, suggesting that this increase is related to muscle damage. However, the modest increase in IL-6, despite large increases in CK, suggests that the IL-6 response to muscle damage does not make an important contribution to the large increase in IL-6 observed during concentric exercise of long duration. Our data also suggest that aging may be associated with impaired repair mechanisms for exercise-induced muscle damage. interleukin-6 tumor necrosis factor-α creatine kinase muscle damage muscle repair Footnotes This project was supported by The Danish National Research Foundation (no. 9900021) and The Danish Research Foundation (no. 514). Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: B. K. Pedersen, Dept. of Infectious Diseases, M7641, Rigshospitalet, Tagensvej 20, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark (E-mail: bkp@rh.dk ). The costs of publication of this article were defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. The article must therefore be hereby marked “ advertisement ” in accordance with 18 U.S.C. Section 1734 solely to indicate this fact. 10.1152/ajpcell.00583.2001 Copyright © 2002 the American Physiological Society

Journal

AJP - Cell PhysiologyThe American Physiological Society

Published: Jul 1, 2002

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