Cross-talk between skeletal muscle and immune cells: muscle-derived mediators and metabolic implications

Cross-talk between skeletal muscle and immune cells: muscle-derived mediators and metabolic... Skeletal muscles contain resident immune cell populations and their abundance and type is altered in inflammatory myopathies, endotoxemia or different types of muscle injury/insult. Within tissues, monocytes differentiate into macrophages and polarize to acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes. Skeletal muscle macrophages play a fundamental role in repair and pathogen clearance. These events require a precisely regulated cross-talk between myofibers and immune cells, involving paracrine/autocrine and contact interactions. Skeletal muscle also undergoes continuous repair as a result of contractile activity that involves participation of myokines and anti-inflammatory input. Finally, skeletal muscle is the major site of dietary glucose disposal; therefore, muscle insulin resistance is essential to the development of whole body insulin resistance. Notably, muscle inflammation is emerging as a potential contributor to insulin resistance. Recent reports show that inflammatory macrophage numbers within muscle are elevated during obesity and that muscle cells in vitro can mount autonomous inflammatory responses under metabolic challenge. Here, we review the nature of skeletal muscle inflammation associated with muscle exercise, damage, and regeneration, endotoxin presence, and myopathies, as well as the new evidence of local inflammation arising with obesity that potentially contributes to insulin resistance. inflammation injury skeletal muscle macrophage cytokines chemokines obesity type 2 diabetes Footnotes ↵ * N. J. Pillon and P. J. Bilan contributed equally to this review. Copyright © 2013 the American Physiological Society « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print December 31, 2012 , doi: 10.​1152/​ajpendo.​00553.​2012 AJP - Endo March 1, 2013 vol. 304 no. 5 E453-E465 » Abstract Full Text Full Text (PDF) All Versions of this Article: ajpendo.00553.2012v1 304/5/E453 most recent Classifications Review Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Pillon, N. J. Articles by Klip, A. PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Pillon, N. J. Articles by Klip, A. Related Content Load related web page information Current Content March 1, 2013 Alert me to new issues of AJP - Endo About the Journal Calls for Papers Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Ethical Policies AuthorChoice PubMed Central Policy Reprints and Permissions Advertising Press Copyright © 2013 the American Physiological Society Print ISSN: 0193-1849 Online ISSN: 1522-1555 var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-2924550-1"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-30"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".physiology.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png AJP - Endocrinology and Metabolism The American Physiological Society

Cross-talk between skeletal muscle and immune cells: muscle-derived mediators and metabolic implications

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Publisher
The American Physiological Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 the American Physiological Society
ISSN
0193-1849
eISSN
1522-1555
D.O.I.
10.1152/ajpendo.00553.2012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Skeletal muscles contain resident immune cell populations and their abundance and type is altered in inflammatory myopathies, endotoxemia or different types of muscle injury/insult. Within tissues, monocytes differentiate into macrophages and polarize to acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes. Skeletal muscle macrophages play a fundamental role in repair and pathogen clearance. These events require a precisely regulated cross-talk between myofibers and immune cells, involving paracrine/autocrine and contact interactions. Skeletal muscle also undergoes continuous repair as a result of contractile activity that involves participation of myokines and anti-inflammatory input. Finally, skeletal muscle is the major site of dietary glucose disposal; therefore, muscle insulin resistance is essential to the development of whole body insulin resistance. Notably, muscle inflammation is emerging as a potential contributor to insulin resistance. Recent reports show that inflammatory macrophage numbers within muscle are elevated during obesity and that muscle cells in vitro can mount autonomous inflammatory responses under metabolic challenge. Here, we review the nature of skeletal muscle inflammation associated with muscle exercise, damage, and regeneration, endotoxin presence, and myopathies, as well as the new evidence of local inflammation arising with obesity that potentially contributes to insulin resistance. inflammation injury skeletal muscle macrophage cytokines chemokines obesity type 2 diabetes Footnotes ↵ * N. J. Pillon and P. J. Bilan contributed equally to this review. Copyright © 2013 the American Physiological Society « Previous | Next Article » Table of Contents This Article Published online before print December 31, 2012 , doi: 10.​1152/​ajpendo.​00553.​2012 AJP - Endo March 1, 2013 vol. 304 no. 5 E453-E465 » Abstract Full Text Full Text (PDF) All Versions of this Article: ajpendo.00553.2012v1 304/5/E453 most recent Classifications Review Services Email this article to a friend Alert me when this article is cited Alert me if a correction is posted Similar articles in this journal Similar articles in Web of Science Similar articles in PubMed Download to citation manager Citing Articles Load citing article information Citing articles via Web of Science Google Scholar Articles by Pillon, N. J. Articles by Klip, A. PubMed PubMed citation Articles by Pillon, N. J. Articles by Klip, A. Related Content Load related web page information Current Content March 1, 2013 Alert me to new issues of AJP - Endo About the Journal Calls for Papers Information for Authors Submit a Manuscript Ethical Policies AuthorChoice PubMed Central Policy Reprints and Permissions Advertising Press Copyright © 2013 the American Physiological Society Print ISSN: 0193-1849 Online ISSN: 1522-1555 var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-2924550-1"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {} var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); try { var pageTracker = _gat._getTracker("UA-189672-30"); pageTracker._setDomainName(".physiology.org"); pageTracker._trackPageview(); } catch(err) {}

Journal

AJP - Endocrinology and MetabolismThe American Physiological Society

Published: Mar 1, 2013

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